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Jerusalem Film Festival 2017 Siege, Redoubtable, The Beguiled, On the Beach at Night Alone, & More

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Jerusalem Film Festival 2017: Siege, Redoubtable, The Beguiled, On the Beach at Night Alone, & More

Jerusalem Film Festival

Jerusalem Film Festival 2017: Siege, Redoubtable, The Beguiled, On the Beach at Night Alone, & More

Jerusalem is a city of beige and tan, a vast barren sprawl that is, despite the brutal heat and muted colors, quite beautiful. Its odd mix of orthodoxy and modernity pair like sand and cement to create something singular and undeterrable. There's a kind of delirious, heat stroke-induced grandeur to its aesthetic uniformity, the caramel-colored homes enclosing you and the occasional swaths of trees providing much sought-after shelter from the sun, the tan and green recalling the colors of Israeli military uniforms. All of the buildings are finished with Jerusalem Stone (which is mostly made up of limestone) to marry the new to the old, to transcend date and age. A parched and pale sky settles over sun-baked façades stacked upon sandy expanses. Feet wrapped in leather sandals slap against the sidewalk and air conditioners spittle from above. “Drink water,” everyone advises. At its apogee, the sun abuses unrepentantly, with cruel omnipotence, yet people persist and keep going where they're going, water bottles in hand. They are stubborn.

Kesha Discovers How to “Learn to Let Go” in New Song and Video

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Kesha Discovers How to “Learn to Let Go” in New Song and Video

RCA Records

Kesha Discovers How to “Learn to Let Go” in New Song and Video

In an interview celebrating the 20th anniversary of the hit sitcom Friends, Lisa Kudrow revealed that her approach to playing Phoebe—her famously eccentric character, whose backstory included a mom who committed suicide, a dad who went to prison, and a pimp who spit in her mouth—was based on a friend from college who “never got down about it, ever.”

Yoko Ono’s Fly, Approximately Infinite Universe, and Feeling the Space, Reissued and Reevaluated

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Yoko Ono’s Fly, Approximately Infinite Universe, and Feeling the Space, Reissued and Reevaluated
Yoko Ono’s Fly, Approximately Infinite Universe, and Feeling the Space, Reissued and Reevaluated

It wasn't long ago when the notion of Yoko Ono's discography getting the deluxe reissue treatment would have sounded like a pipe dream—or a pipe nightmare, depending on one's perspective. But recent years have been kind to the controversial artist, whose importance to contemporary conceptual art, feminism, and even popular music has finally outpaced her reputation as the Woman Who Broke Up the Beatles. Earlier this month, Secretly Canadian Records released their second wave of Ono reissues on CD, vinyl, and digital: Fly (1971), Approximately Infinite Universe (1973), and Feeling the Space (1973). All three are among Ono's finest and most accessible albums, and they're also among the first in rock history to so explicitly foreground feminist principles.

Premiere: Boy Meets Boy in Bright Light Bright Light’s “Into the Night” Music Video

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Premiere: Boy Meets Boy in Bright Light Bright Light’s “Into the Night” Music Video

Daniel Robinson

Premiere: Boy Meets Boy in Bright Light Bright Light’s “Into the Night” Music Video

A companion piece to Bright Light Bright Light's music video for “New York Pretty,” the first single from his new EP Tales of the City, “Into the Night” finds Welsh singer-songwriter Rod Thomas paying tribute to his adopted hometown of New York City. Along his route from Brooklyn to Manhattan, Thomas walks by the Williamsburg Bridge and queer landmarks like Stonewall.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 11

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 11

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 11

Where last week's episode of Twin Peaks: The Return brought intimations of encroaching darkness on a tide of unflinching violence and male brutality, last night's installment divides its time pretty evenly between domestic drama, furthering the show's overarching mythology, and an extended set piece of seriocomic pop surrealism. In a tidy structural parallel, “Part 11” opens with a pair of scenes that extend (and complicate) events from last week. The first reveals that eyewitness Miriam Sullivan (Sarah Jean Long) somehow survived Richard Horne's assault and attempted assassination via makeshift gas-oven-and-candle explosive. It's safe to say that Horne's misdeeds will now see the light of day, setting up an inevitable showdown with the authorities that seems likely to end in a hail of bullets.

Game of Thrones Recap Season 7, Episode 2, “Stormborn”

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Game of Thrones Recap: Season 7, Episode 2, “Stormborn”

Helen Sloan/HBO

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 7, Episode 2, “Stormborn”

Once upon a time on Game of Thrones, Oberyn Martell made an oath to Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey), promising that her daughter, who'd been sent to Dorne as part of a marriage treaty, would be treated well: “We don't hurt little girls in Dorne.” After Oberyn's death, however, his vengeful lover, Ellaria Sand (Indira Varma), did precisely that, poisoning the innocent girl. Now, months later, Tyrion Lannister (Peter Dinklage) calls Ellaria to account for that, passionately arguing before Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) that they be more than indiscriminate murderers. It's one of many callbacks to past actions that are brought up in “Stormborn,” an episode that's not only packed with intrigue, intimacy, and insanity, but also with a richness of history.

Insecure Recap Season 2, Episode 1, “Hella Great”

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Insecure Recap: Season 2, Episode 1, “Hella Great”

HBO

Insecure Recap: Season 2, Episode 1, “Hella Great”

It's nighttime in Los Angeles. Or, to more accurately locate the universe of HBO's Insecure, it's nighttime in Inglewood. That's evident upon watching the opening moments of the show's second season, which feature a number of familiar establishing shots from the South L.A. neighborhood. One can't help but notice that the introduction to “Hella Great” bears a striking resemblance to that of the show's pilot. Each contains requisite shots of locales like Randy's Donuts and the Forum, and in the background blares a cherry-picked track (Kendrick's “Alright” in season one, NxWorries's “Scared Money” here).

The Films of Christopher Nolan Ranked

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The Films of Christopher Nolan Ranked
The Films of Christopher Nolan Ranked

There’s an engimatic quality to the role of Christopher Nolan in the current filmmaking landscape, and one that stands apart from the fact that his films so often court ambiguity with explicit intent. From the Russian-nesting-doll antics of Inception to the magicians-as-filmmakers commentary of The Prestige, Nolan’s ambition within the realm of big-budget, broad audience spectacle is comparable to the likes of few. Among those, James Cameron comes to mind, and now Nolan joins the Avatar director with his own film about interplanetary travel, the logical next step for a filmmaker so concerned with world-building, literal and otherwise. Looking back at his work thus far, what emerges—apart from his obsession with identity, reality, community, and obsession itself—is an artist who, heedless of his own shortcomings, is intent on challenging himself, a quality that salvages and even inverts a great many of his otherwise pedestrian choices. One suspects that this is an artist still in his pupa stage, and one is also fearful that the near-unanimous praise heaped upon his work since his breakout hit, Memento, will only serve to keep him there. To wit, his latest film, Dunkirk, employs the kind of chronology-bending antics that epitomize Memento and Inception. Rob Humanick

The 15 Best Whitney Houston Singles

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The 15 Best Whitney Houston Singles
The 15 Best Whitney Houston Singles

On August 25, Whitney: Can I Be Me will make its TV premiere on Showtime. Nick Broomfield's documentary focuses largely on Whitney Houston's tumultuous private life, and at one point a member of the singer's inner circle suggests that the whitewashed image that was crafted for Houston by her handlers was, in part, responsible for her inevitable self-destruction. It's no secret that Houston was largely an A&R creation, a traditional vocalist who emerged in the era of Michael Jackson and Madonna, two self-empowered artists who took 360-degree creative control of their careers.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 10

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 10

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 10

In “The Marriage of Heaven and Hell,” William Blake wrote: “Without Contraries is no progression…Love and Hate are necessary to Human existence.” Last night's installment of Twin Peaks: The Return illuminated the precarious balance between these two opposing forces, previously represented as overarching cosmic principles in “Part 8” but here embodied at the level of all-too-human experience in ways both touching and terrifying.