Radiohead Drops New Single & Wicker Man-Inspired Music Video for "Burn the Witch"

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Radiohead Drops New Single & Wicker Man-Inspired Music Video for "Burn the Witch"
Radiohead Drops New Single & Wicker Man-Inspired Music Video for "Burn the Witch"

After a series of Instagram teasers and mysterious leaflets sent to fans that made mention of the song's title, Radiohead has released “Burn the Witch,” the first single from their ninth studio album. Rumored to be called Dawn Chorus, the upcoming album will be the band's first in over five years, following 2011's The King of Limbs. “Burn the Witch,” which goes on sale at midnight, has reportedly been in the works for at least 15 years, as far back as 2001's Kid A. True to the band's long-established brand, the track melds digital and analog, with staccato guitar stabs, lush orchestral swells, and of course, frontman Thom Yorke's sonorous wails undergirded by buzzing electronic sounds and Colin Greenwood's distinctive bass. “Stand in the shadows/To the gallows/This is a round-up,” Yorke cautions at the song's start, with all the paranoia and politically shaded intrigue we've come to expect.

A Disarmingly Humanist Vision Don DeLillo’s Zero K

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A Disarmingly Humanist Vision: Don DeLillo’s Zero K
A Disarmingly Humanist Vision: Don DeLillo’s Zero K

Late in Don DeLillo's latest novel, Zero K, an unnamed operative of the Convergence, a cultish institute offering the promise of immortality via cryogenic freezing, tells a group of soon-to-be-frozen patients, “You are completely outside the narrative of what we refer to as history.” Adherents of the Convergence's quasi-religious ideology are attempting to outrun not just death, but language, geography, even humanity itself. In the hallways of the Convergence, video screens display montages of mass death (climate catastrophe, terror, war), reminders of the human horror they're escaping. Once resurrected from their deep-freeze slumber, they'll awake to a world liberated from horror and also freed from the banal strictures of daily life, the weight of the past, the limitations of human perception. They'll even speak a new language, one that “will offer new meanings, entire new levels of perception.”

Game of Thrones Recap Season 6, Episode 2, "Home"

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Game of Thrones Recap: Season 6, Episode 2, "Home"

HBO

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 6, Episode 2, "Home"

Bran Stark (Isaac Hempstead Wright) is dreaming of better days, specifically his long-lost Winterfell, where he watches as his father, Ned, and uncle, Benjen, learn to spar. He even happens upon a slow stable boy, Willis, and realizes that this is an even more innocent version of the man who's been protecting him in the present, Hodor (Kristian Nairn). This, of course, is an illusion, and the mysterious vision-sharing man known only as the Three-Eyed Raven (Max von Sydow) soon pulls Bran back to his crippled reality. “You finally show me something I care about, and then you drag me away,” shouts Bran, and it's hard not to hear echoes of the most ardent yet frustrated Game of Thrones fans, because the show's sprawling narrative has room for no more than 10 minutes an episode for each character. That makes it increasingly hard to becoming truly invested in any of them, especially with a new subplot on the Iron Islands, where the possibly insane Euron Greyjoy (Pilou Asbæk), claiming to be the Drowned God, deposes his brother, Balon (Patrick Malahide), by flinging him over a rickety bridge in the middle of a storm.

Rihanna Reunites with Calvin Harris for "This Is What You Came For"

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Rihanna Reunites with Calvin Harris for "This Is What You Came For"

Rihanna x Stance

Rihanna Reunites with Calvin Harris for "This Is What You Came For"

Rihanna's latest album, Anti, is notable for its dearth of dance beats. The EDM bubble has, of course, deflated, if not burst, but some of the singer's biggest hits have beckoned listeners to the dance floor: “Pon de Replay,” “SOS,” “Don't Stop the Music,” “Only Girl (In the World).” Her crowning achievement in the genre is her collaboration with Scottish super-DJ/producer Calvin Harris, “We Found Love,” a song our own Eric Henderson once claimed “makes the urge to get turnt up feel like an almost religious impulse.”

Kesha Shows Her "True Colors" on New Zedd Track

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Kesha Shows Her "True Colors" on New Zedd Track

Interscope

Kesha Shows Her "True Colors" on New Zedd Track

Just two months after her lawsuit against producer Dr. Luke, a.k.a. Lukasz Gottwald, for allegedly drugging, raping, and verbally abusing her was tossed out by a New York judge, barring the singer from recording outside the parameters of her contract with the Swedish super-producer, Kesha is already releasing new music. But don't call it a loophole. Russian DJ Zedd took to Twitter to explain that Dr. Luke's label, to which the “Fuck Him He's a DJ” singer is signed, had given their blessing for the release.

The Americans Recap Season 4, Episode 7, "Travel Agents"

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The Americans Recap: Season 4, Episode 7, "Travel Agents"

Eric Liebowitz/FX

The Americans Recap: Season 4, Episode 7, "Travel Agents"

Tonight's episode of The Americans comes to a head as Elizabeth (Keri Russell) knocks the wind out of Martha (Alison Wright), the latter's insistent protests supplanted by staccato gasps. In the show's arc this season, “Travel Agents” performs much the same function: A sharp exhalation, a moment of release, paves the way for a more restrained, if no less formidable, reckoning. One half of the episode is made up of searches, stakeouts, and wiretaps; the other, of questions, confessions, and tangled sympathies. It is, in short, a cleverly constructed hybrid, resolving the tension of the previous three episodes only to unleash a torrent of emotion. It's as if the body blow Elizabeth delivers is the last crack in the dam, and the characters are left waiting downriver for the terrible flood to arrive.

Game of Thrones Recap Season 6, Episode 1, "The Red Woman"

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Game of Thrones Recap: Season 6, Episode 1, "The Red Woman"

HBO

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 6, Episode 1, "The Red Woman"

Previous seasons of Game of Thrones have played a precarious dance between the past and present action detailed within George R.R. Martin's series, but the season-six premiere episode, “The Red Woman,” provides viewers with their first glimpse of what the future looks like, and it's disappointing. Melisandre (Carice van Houten), the sorceress from whom this episode takes its title, stands over the bloodless corpse of Jon Snow (Kit Harington) and remarks that “I saw him in the flames, fighting at Winterfell.” Magic may yet play a role in some sort of resurrection, but this episode focuses only on the weary, bitter state of affairs in Westeros.

Prince’s Minneapolis: The Town the Kid Built

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Prince’s Minneapolis: The Town the Kid Built
Prince’s Minneapolis: The Town the Kid Built

Three days later and I still have difficulty defining the heightened emotional state we've been experiencing in Minneapolis. I've personally been spontaneously ambushed by welling tears that have been hardly unexpected. But whether Prince's death knocked you flat or merely held your attention, to be in Minneapolis right now, and to see and read about the tributes pouring in from every corner of the globe, is to tap into a once-in-a-lifetime moment of civic communion. You don't have to be Prince's biggest fan—I'm about 97 to 98 percent sure I'm not—to recognize it. This is a town of 3.5 million Prince stories.

Tribeca Film Festival 2016 Mr. Church

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Tribeca Film Festival 2016: Mr. Church

Darren Michaels

Tribeca Film Festival 2016: Mr. Church

Bruce Beresford's Mr. Church is remarkable for how it manages to indulge so many offensive and shopworn clichés at once. A risible example of the magical negro trope, Henry Church (Eddie Murphy) appears in the lives of Marie (Natascha McElhone) and her daughter, Charlotte (played as a girl by Natalie Coughlin, then as a teenager and adult by Britt Robertson) as if out of the ether. Marie has been given six months to live from breast cancer and Henry, it turns out, has been hired by the woman's deceased ex-lover to be the mother and daughter's personal cook. But Marie hangs on, with six months becoming six years, which is enough time for this true renaissance man to become a surrogate father to Charlotte, encouraging her to read more and a become a writer (an ambition that she puts on hold after an unexpected pregnancy), as well as a painter and jazz pianist.

Tribeca Film Festival 2016 The Phenom

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Tribeca Film Festival 2016: The Phenom

RLJ Entertainment

Tribeca Film Festival 2016: The Phenom

Noah Buschel's The Phenom may be about a struggling young pitcher's attempt to overcome his mental block after a bad baseball game has him sent down to the minors, but the film is by no means a standard sports movie. Outside of an opening scene of baseball action that turns out to be archival footage two people are watching on a TV set, there's none of the big-game action and sentimental triumph-over-adversity arcs that are usually de rigueur for these types of films. Instead, The Phenom is mostly made up of a series of conversations: therapy sessions and confrontations, the film diving into the past in order to understand the present, the way pitching wunderkind Hopper Gibson (Johnny Simmons) explores his own personal history under the guidance of his psychologist, Dr. Mobley (Paul Giamatti).