Watch the First Episode of TNT’s New Crime Family Drama Animal Kingdom

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Watch the First Episode of TNT’s New Crime Family Drama Animal Kingdom

TNT

Watch the First Episode of TNT’s New Crime Family Drama Animal Kingdom

The pilot episode for TNT's newly anointed flagship series, Animal Kingdom, is now available to watch in full. Adapted from the acclaimed 2010 Australian film of the same name, the series is a Sons of Anarchy-style criminal family drama featuring a tough-as-nails SoCal matriarch played by Ellen Barkin, taking on Jacki Weaver's Oscar-nominated role from the film. In a genre littered with desperately hip pretenders, writer-director David Michôd's debut feature was a crime film of nearly biblical sound and fury, and judging by the trailer, TNT's series aims to replicate the Aussie cult film's success. Created by Jonathan Lisco (Halt and Catch Fire, Southland) and executive-produced by John Wells (The West Wing, Shameless), Animal Kingdom also stars Scott Speedman, Shawn Hatosy, Ben Robson, Jake Weary, Finn Cole, Molly Gordon, and Daniella Alonso.

Watch Adele’s Kaleidoscopic Music Video for “Send My Love (To Your New Lover)”

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Watch Adele’s Kaleidoscopic Music Video for “Send My Love (To Your New Lover)”
Watch Adele’s Kaleidoscopic Music Video for “Send My Love (To Your New Lover)”

Madonna sang a duet with Stevie Wonder as part of her touching tribute to Prince, Kesha performed a stunning cover of Bob Dylan's “It Ain't Me Babe,” and Britney Spears stripped and lip-synched her way through 10 songs at last night's Billboard Music Awards. But the night belonged to Adele, who wasn't even there. The singer won five awards, including Top Album and Top Artist, and premiered the music video for her new single “Send Me Love (To Your New Lover),” from her album 25.

Game of Thrones Recap Season 6, Episode 5, "The Door"

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Game of Thrones Recap: Season 6, Episode 5, "The Door"

HBO

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 6, Episode 5, "The Door"

There's been much talk of prophecy on Game of Thrones, but it's usually in an abstract sense. After all, those who follow the Lord of Light, like Melisandre (Carice van Houten), have been wrong before, and the newest Red Priestess, Kinvara (Ania Bukstein), might be wrong about Daenerys being the chosen one. But she's right when she tells a skeptical Varys (Conleth Hill) that God is never wrong, only sometimes misinterpreted by his messengers. Even more accurate is her observation that “Terrible things happen for a reason.”

Cannes Film Festival 2016 Winner Predictions

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Cannes Film Festival 2016 Winner Predictions

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Festival 2016 Winner Predictions

Coming into this year's Cannes Film Festival, it looked like the programmers had whipped up one of the festival's strongest lineups in a long time, and for the most part, that turned out to be true: There may have been no one masterpiece on the order of Hou Hsiao-hsien's The Assassin from last year, but there were also hardly any outright bad films; even the two worst in competition (Sean Penn's The Last Face and Brilliante Mendoza's Ma' Rosa) aren't quite the catastrophes some have made them out to be.

Two themes stuck out, neither necessarily expected: the prevalence of women's narratives, both strong and empowered like those in Paul Verhoeven's Elle and Kleber Mendoça Filho's Aquarius and deeply vulnerable like the central figures of Pedro Almodóvar's Julieta and Olivier Assayas's Personal Shopper. The other common factor shared between many of this year's competition films was their sense of humor; Maren Ade's Toni Erdmann and Bruno Dumont's Slack Bay are both essentially comedies, and even Romanian heavyweight Cristi Puiu's Sieranevada makes room for a lot of laughs in its chaotic portrait of family dysfunction.

Cannes Film Review: The Long Night of Francisco Sanctis

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Cannes Film Review: The Long Night of Francisco Sanctis

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Review: The Long Night of Francisco Sanctis

Co-written and co-directed by Francisco Márquez and Andrea Testa, The Long Night of Francisco Sanctis is about being awake to one's historical context and how this context leaves no one untouched. The film's middle-aged protagonist (Diego Velázquez) is a bored office-dweller who long ago, during college, used to write about working-class revolution. Yet his only dreams, at present, are about a raise. He's in Argentina, in 1978, where a military dictatorship has been, for the past two years, “disappearing” thousands of dissidents. But this doesn't seem to worry him, as he cultivates what modern Argentines would call a “fascist mustache,” like that worn by then de facto President Jorge Rafael Videla, to whom Velázquez, with his sunken cheeks and long face, bears a striking resemblance.

Cannes Film Review: Elle

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Cannes Film Review: Elle

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Review: Elle

The Cannes Film Festival saved the best for last: Paul Verhoeven's Elle is an ingenuously constructed drama that roots all of its complexities in matters of character. Isabelle Huppert's Michéle is a woman gradually revealed in her interactions with others, and in the details she divulges about herself. When she was only 10 years old, she was party to the brutal mass murder committed by her Christian fundamentalist father, a tragedy immortalized in a documentary, The Accused Will Rise, that occasionally airs on French television in the film. The reputation of Michéle's family has consequently suffered, but the woman's own self-confidence hasn't wavered, leading to her considerable success as CEO of an erotic video-game company.

Cannes Film Review: The Unknown Girl

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Cannes Film Review: The Unknown Girl

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Review: The Unknown Girl

Between 1996 and 2005, Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne made four uniformly masterful films, all updating the moral and aesthetic principles of Italian neorealism to contemporary cultural and socioeconomic concerns. Films like Rosetta and L'Enfant are masterpieces because they come upon their empathy and their distinctly humanist messages without the slightest sign of calculation. These films are quintessentially character pieces: The Dardennes' over-the-shoulder camera technique has become a kind of shorthand in European cinema for self-conscious attempts to create the visceral experience of a given, usually lower-class environment, but for the brothers it always tethered us to understandings of specific characters' emotions. In recent years, though, the Dardennes have swapped their organic style for a more clinical and mannered one, and the results have tended to show the schematics of a formula that had always been so well concealed.

Cannes Film Review: The Neon Demon

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Cannes Film Review: The Neon Demon

Wild Bunch

Cannes Film Review: The Neon Demon

Nicolas Winding Refn is such a manicured stylist that, in one sense, a horror-thriller set in the fashion world seems like the perfect project for the Danish film director. And when The Neon Demon, a propulsive vehicle for lavish Eurotrash images like the prismatic one of Elle Fanning feigning a make-out session with two of her refracted reflections, is playing like a slicker version of Black Swan, it's a formidable piece of genre work—that genre being loosely giallo-inspired. Refn's film is superior to Darren Aronofsky's because it has no pretensions toward any psychological depth; nor does it adapt self-conscious art-film tropes like the Dardennes-esque tracking shots that bogged down stretches of Black Swan. For a while at least, and discounting a few painfully awkward dialogue scenes, The Neon Demon seems like Refn's most surface-level-satisfying film since Drive.

Cannes Film Review: It’s Only the End of the World

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Cannes Film Review: It’s Only the End of the World

Cannes Film Festival

Cannes Film Review: It’s Only the End of the World

Xavier Dolan's films are either about the families we take refuge in or the ones we take refuge from. But It's Only the End of the World might be the first that's about both. Based on a play by the late Jean-Luc Lagarce, this fever-pitch melodrama stars Gaspard Ulliel as Louis, a gay writer suffering through an unnamed illness, who returns to his family home after a 12-year absence to try and break the news of his impending death to his mother (Nathalie Baye) and siblings (Léa Seydoux, Vincent Cassel, and Marion Cotillard).

The Americans Recap Season 4, Episode 10, "Munchkins"

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The Americans Recap: Season 4, Episode 10, "Munchkins"

Craig Blankenhorn/FX

The Americans Recap: Season 4, Episode 10, "Munchkins"

“This isn't normal!” Paige (Holly Taylor) cried in last season's “Stingers,” urging Philip (Matthew Rhys) and Elizabeth (Keri Russell) to reveal the truth. “I've felt it for a long time now, and I thought it was me. I thought I was crazy. But it's not me, it's you!” With tonight's episode, “Munchkins,” The Americans reopens the argument, and it appears that Paige's sense of trust has been shaken loose by the knowledge of her parents' double lives: In accepting the new “normal” of secrets and lies, the daughter of deep-cover agents has become as suspicious as they are, and Pastor Tim's disappearance in Ethiopia forces her to examine her grim intuition once more. “Paige, this is crazy,” Elizabeth bridles, echoing the climactic moment of “Stingers,” but as we've come to learn in the season since, the sanest instinct in the world of The Americans is not faith, but doubt.