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Lust For Life (#110 of 3)

Lana Del Rey Drops Two New Songs: “Summer Bummer” and “Groupie Love”

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Lana Del Rey Drops Two New Songs: “Summer Bummer” and “Groupie Love”

Interscope Records

Lana Del Rey Drops Two New Songs: “Summer Bummer” and “Groupie Love”

Lana Del Rey’s foray into hip-hop might seem long overdue, but judging by the languid tempos of “Summer Bummer” and “Groupie Love,” two newly released songs from her forthcoming album, Lust for Life, the singer-songwriter is perfectly fine taking her sweet time.

Based on its title at least, the former could be seen as a quasi-sequel to her 2013 hit “Summertime Sadness,” only with EDM traded for hip-hop. Del Rey purrs lines like “Hip-hop in the summer/Don’t be a bummer, babe/Be my undercover lover, babe” atop a sparse loop and half-buried rhymes by guests A$AP Rocky and Playboi Carti, who eventually take the mic for a lengthy verse of their own, boasting: “I might fuck with her all summer for real.”

Lana Del Rey and The Weeknd’s “Lust for Life” Is Utterly Cool

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Lana Del Rey and The Weeknd’s “Lust for Life” Is Utterly Cool
Lana Del Rey and The Weeknd’s “Lust for Life” Is Utterly Cool

If “Love,” the dreamy first single from Lana Del Rey’s upcoming album, Lust for Life, felt like more of the same from the soporific singer-songwriter, the newly released title track is a refreshing about-face. Opening with the sound of a motorcycle revving its engine, “Lust for Life” reprises the themes—youth, love, death, escape—of countless Del Rey songs before it: “They say only the good die young/That just ain’t right/’Cause we’re having too much fun,” she laments. Some ’60s girl-group shoops underscore Del Rey’s spoken passages, which make nods to the Angels’s “My Boyfriend’s Back.”

Berlinale 2017: T2 Trainspotting Review

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Berlinale 2017: T2 Trainspotting Review

TriStar Pictures

Berlinale 2017: T2 Trainspotting Review

Compared to its predecessor, T2 Trainspotting is a relatively aimless and sedate experience. But that’s to be expected for a film that’s largely about people trying to move on from the follies of their youth and finding themselves unable to let go of the past. Director Danny Boyle’s style this time around fully reflects this: Dialing down the devil-may-care impulsiveness that he brought to disquietingly exhilarating effect in Trainspotting, he allows a reflective melancholy to seep through even the film’s loosest sections, a quality that was nowhere in evidence in the original because the characters were too busy getting high or trying to avoid falling back into the habit.