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Star Trek Ii: The Wrath Of Khan (#110 of 2)

The Conversations: Star Trek

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The Conversations: Star Trek
The Conversations: Star Trek

JASON BELLAMY: America’s relationship with Star Trek began before man ever set foot on the moon. Gene Roddenberry’s creation was born in 1966 and lasted three seasons on TV before dying of low ratings in 1969. Forty years, endless reruns, four live-action TV series and 10 feature films later, Star Trek is alive and well in the pop culture. In just a few days, on May 8, the crew of the starship Enterprise—Kirk, Spock, Bones, Scotty, Uhura, Sulu and Chekov—will hit the big screen yet again in an origin story directed by J.J. Abrams. Star Trek, as the film is simply called, is perhaps the most anticipated movie of the spring. And though its arrival is hardly a surprise in this era of remakes and retreads, the brand’s longevity is nonetheless impressive.

From 1987-2005, there was some form of modern Star Trek on TV. The Next Generation (1987-94) begat Deep Space Nine (1993-99), which begat Voyager (1995-2001), which begat Enterprise (2001-05). All of these series can be traced back to the 1966 pilot that started it all, but it’s safe to say that none of these series would have been possible without the varied yet undeniable success of Star Trek at the cinema. From 1979-91, six Star Trek films were released featuring the recognizable cast and characters of the original TV series. Almost two decades later, these films are cherished by some (“Trekkies” or “Trekkers”), mocked by others and seemingly ignored by everyone else.

5 for the Day: When Titles Collide

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5 for the Day: When Titles Collide
5 for the Day: When Titles Collide

Mismatched plots, mixed motivations, dogs and cats living together… mass hysteria! This is what happens when movie titles that share some of the same words come crashing together.

1. Aguirre, The Wrath of Khan: When the crew of the Starship Enterprise answer a distress signal originating in Machu Picchu, little do they realize that it is a trap set for them by Kirk’s (William Shatner) old nemesis Khan (Klaus Kinski), now a despotic conquistador with delusions of grandeur. As Khan leads his captives deeper and deeper into the Amazonian jungle, they all become slave to his lunatic quest, save for Mr. Spock (Leonard Nimoy) who—with the aid of a pack of wild howler monkeys—makes the ultimate, tear-jerking sacrifice.