The Family (#110 of 3)

Box Office Rap The Wizard of Oz and the IMAX Cancer

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Box Office Rap: The Wizard of Oz and the IMAX Cancer
Box Office Rap: The Wizard of Oz and the IMAX Cancer

“The last time I checked, I owned the films that we're in the process of colorizing…I can do whatever I want with them, and if they're going to be shown on television, they're going to be in color.” These are words spoken by media mogul Ted Turner in 1986, as reported by the Los Angeles Times, defending his decision to colorize classic black-and-white films for television airwaves, most famously Casablanca, leading Roger Ebert to call its colorized airing “one of the saddest days in the history of movies.” That sadness, Ebert claimed, comes from knowing that even the most beloved classics aren't safe from “computerized graffiti gangs.” Well, this weekend, The Wizard of Oz boots Riddick from IMAX theaters, coming at viewers not only in the format's scale-oriented excesses, but also in 3D. Thus, though we may still refer to the film as The Wizard of Oz, Warner Bros. is going with The Wizard of Oz: An IMAX 3D Experience. So, a question becomes pertinent: How is turning a 1939 Technicolor film into a 2013 IMAX 3D “experience” any different from Ted Turner colorizing Casablanca?

Box Office Rap Insidious: Chapter 2 and the Twitter Index

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Box Office Rap: Insidious: Chapter 2 and the Twitter Index
Box Office Rap: Insidious: Chapter 2 and the Twitter Index

I imagine that predicting box-office grosses on a weekly basis in a pre-social media, pre-Internet environment would not only have been difficult, but virtually impossible to register with any accuracy, unless said prognosticator held a position of some esteem within the film industry. Let's give this pre-era a concrete date—say, roughly 1999. I choose this year not because of Y2K or the neat temporal markers brought about by a new millennium, but because that year introduced Brandon Grey's website Box Office Mojo, which specializes not just in forums meant for box-office speak, but seeks to function as a comprehensive, online database for the domestic and international grosses of every film released in North American theaters within the modern era. Now, 14 years later, the site offers such information dating back to 1980, a year significant to film history for many reasons, though more because it's a year that symbolizes the death of New Hollywood filmmaking and the full-on emergence of a blockbuster mentality within the studio system. The Empire Strikes Back was the highest-grossing film of the year; Michael Cimino's Heaven's Gate was met with devastating financial and critical failure, to the extent that United Artists went bankrupt. Moreover, Peter Bogdanovich has suggested that contemporary film students possess no conception of film history prior to Raging Bull—also released in 1980.

Trailer and Poster Drop for Scorsese-Backed Luc Besson Flick The Family

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Trailer and Poster Drop for Scorsese-Backed Luc Besson Flick <em>The Family</em>
Trailer and Poster Drop for Scorsese-Backed Luc Besson Flick <em>The Family</em>

In case you were wondering what the movie version of The Sopranos might have looked like, director Luc Besson and producer Martin Scorsese are giving you a taste with The Family, a film that seems to follow the HBO drama's lead, albeit with a madcap comedic spin. Formerly titled Malavita (an infinitely cooler name), the movie, whose poster and trailer were just released, could be imagined as a continuation of the Soprano clan's saga, as it follows a proud mafioso (Robert De Niro), his not-to-be-messed-with wife (Michelle Pfeiffer), their angsty daughter (Diana Agron), and their mischievous son (John D'Leo) as they all struggle to adjust to their life in witness protection, a life some fans thought was the fate of Tony, Carmela, et al.