Abel Ferrara (#110 of 25)

The 10 Greatest Vampire Movies

Comments Comments (...)

The 10 Greatest Vampire Movies
The 10 Greatest Vampire Movies

From Bram Stoker to Anne Rice, from Nosferatu to Buffy, it's safe to say our cultural fascination with the blood-sucking undead isn't going away anytime soon. Not unlike zombies, those other revivified metaphors that feast on the living, the template afforded by these folkloric beings allows for no shortage of insights into the human condition, with the topics of sexuality, addiction, and mortality chief among them. By far the most famous of these, Dracula, is often cited as the most popular fictional character in all of cinema, with nearly 200 separate film appearances according to IMDb. Of course, the legend of these creatures extends far beyond just this particular icon, and those who are quick to mock the Twilight franchise for allowing its fanged characters to appear in full sunlight, unperturbed, are clearly unaware of the elasticity they've exhibited throughout both print and film history. Here, a fairly strict definition of the corporeal undead has been employed (apologies to Louis Feuillade and Claire Denis). These 10 films highlight not just great vampire films, but great films, period, and for each that made the cut, there was at least one more vying for inclusion.

Toronto International Film Festival 2014 Pasolini, Tales, & Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2

Comments Comments (...)

Toronto International Film Festival 2014: Pasolini, Tales, & Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2
Toronto International Film Festival 2014: Pasolini, Tales, & Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2

Abel Ferrara's Pasolini may not be the finest film playing at Toronto this year, but this wholly unconventional biopic manages to stick in the brain like few I've seen so far. Taking for its subject only the last day of Pier Paolo Pasolini's life, the film should, by normal generic conventions, be nothing more than foreshadowing for Pasolini's grisly murder. Instead, it's almost defiantly banal, focused on the simple tasks of making art, such as reviewing rushes, typing and revising copy, and workshopping ideas with peers and loved ones. In terms of commitment and research and all the other method trappings that turn real lives into showboating for actors, Willem Dafoe brings little more than his slight resemblance to Pasolini, an extraordinarily freeing decision that, in classic Ferrara style, deliberately foregrounds the actor's own identity along with the character's, making plain the work of acting just as the film itself looks at the other elements of artistic production.

Fantastic Fest 2013: Coherence, Patrick, Why Don’t You Play in Hell?, & The Congress

Comments Comments (...)

Fantastic Fest 2013: <em>Coherence</em>, <em>Patrick</em>, <em>Why Don’t You Play in Hell?</em>, & <em>The Congress</em>
Fantastic Fest 2013: <em>Coherence</em>, <em>Patrick</em>, <em>Why Don’t You Play in Hell?</em>, & <em>The Congress</em>

This year, the ever-anarchic and genre-heavy nerd Valhalla known as Fantastic Fest delivered more blood-soaked, supernaturally tinged cinematic offerings from around the globe and advocated a distinct devil-may-care endorsement of debauchery. As the saying goes, “chaos reigns.” This cheeky slogan was eagerly adopted by the film festival's organizers as an unofficial motto, derived of course from Lars von Trier's Antichrist, which screened at the festival in 2009. From opening-night premieres of loud, big-budget, guns-a'-blazin fare like Robert Rodriguez's Machete Kills to non-cinematic, Texas-style, off-site savagery such as outings to hunt wild hogs from helicopters (seriously!), it's in many ways difficult to believe that this year's Fantastic Fest was both real and somehow completely legal.