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Garbage Releases Dystopian Single “No Horses” Benefiting the Red Cross

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Garbage Releases Dystopian Single “No Horses” Benefiting the Red Cross
Garbage Releases Dystopian Single “No Horses” Benefiting the Red Cross

Though “No Horses” isn’t explicitly about the Trump administration, Shirley Manson describes Garbage’s new single as a “panic attack” that imagines a dystopian, über-capitalist future ruled by a regime that values profit above all else. One hundred percent of the band’s earnings from the song, released today, will be donated to the International Committee of the Red Cross.

Five Things I Learned at Garbage’s 20 Years Queer Tour

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Five Things I Learned at Garbage’s 20 Years Queer Tour

Joseph Cultice

Five Things I Learned at Garbage’s 20 Years Queer Tour

The meaning of the word “queer” has evolved over the years, even in its more modern iteration, from a pejorative slur against gays to—by the time the American-Scottish band Garbage employed it as a song title in 1995—a term reclaimed as a blanket descriptor for an increasingly diverse LGBT community. Of course, pseudo-etymologists Shirley Manson, Butch Vig, Duke Erikson, and Steve Marker’s “Queer,” released two decades ago this week, used the word in its most innocuous colloquial form—at least on the surface. But that their new tour is unabashedly called 20 Years Queer, a celebration of their self-titled debut album, suggests they’re aware of the progress that’s been made since their figurative coming-out party in the mid ’90s. Since then, Garbage has been nominated for Album of the Year at the Grammys (for 1998’s Version 2.0), written and recorded a Bond theme (1999’s “The World Is Not Enough”), and reunited with some of the key figures who helped launch their career. I caught the band halfway through their tour at Brooklyn’s recently refurbished Kings Theatre, of which the band, who have toured the world over several times now, claim to have been in awe when they arrived. Here’s what I learned: