Darya Ekamasova (#110 of 2)

The Americans Recap Season 5, Episode 8, "Immersion"

Comments Comments (...)

The Americans Recap: Season 5, Episode 8, "Immersion"

Jeffrey Neira/FX

The Americans Recap: Season 5, Episode 8, "Immersion"

Another week, another episode of The Americans that's notable for its pervasive lack of hurry. Philip (Matthew Rhys) slowly drives home from his meeting with Gabriel, the camera hanging back to give us one of the widest-ever views to date of the exterior of the Jennings home, and fills Elizabeth (Keri Russell) in about their now-former handler's thoughts on Renee and Paige (Holly Taylor). They speak of Gabriel almost as if he's a ghost, and with an understanding that they will one day become every bit as haunted as he was when he walked out of the safe house for what was probably the last time. Unsurprisingly, then, they put up walls when they go to meet Claudia (Margo Martindale) and discuss their latest plan of attack, because to stave off a human connection with their new handler is to stand back from that precipice of moral oblivion they've been inching toward for so long.

The Americans Recap Season 5, Episode 7, "The Committee on Human Rights"

Comments Comments (...)

The Americans Recap: Season 5, Episode 7, "The Committee on Human Rights"

Eric Liebowitz/FX

The Americans Recap: Season 5, Episode 7, "The Committee on Human Rights"

Directed by Matthew Rhys, this week's episode of The Americans, “The Committee on Human Rights,” begins exactly where “Crossbreed” left off. But let me begin at the end, specifically with that haunting image of Gabriel (Frank Langella) and Philip (Rhys) seated across from one another inside the former's apartment. Throughout this evocatively staged sequence that serves as a tribute to Gabriel's work throughout the years in trying to keep Philip and Elizabeth (Keri Russell) well informed and grounded, my eye kept gravitating to a patch of white unpainted wall near Gabriel's head. And my mind went to Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Pulse, a film in which people leave behind splotchy black stains—redolent of the blast shadows of Hiroshima victims—on walls when they die, or simply go missing. That blackness is a symbol of all that's inexplicable about our lives, just as the swath of unpainted wall here represents the one thing that Gabriel doesn't come clean about throughout a profound unloading of his conscience: that he kept Mischa away from Philip.