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Tobias Lindholm (#110 of 5)

David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

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David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

Netflix

David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

“How do we get ahead of crazy if we don’t know how crazy thinks?” So says the F.B.I. agent played by Holt McCallany at the end of the teaser trailer for the Netflix series Mindhunter. For David Fincher, the show will be yet another opportunity for the filmmaker to return to the scene of his first cinematic triumph: the serial-killer genre. The series, which will also be directed by Asif Kapadia, Tobias Lindholm, and Andrew Douglas, and is executive produced by Fincher, Joshua Donen, Charlize Theron, and Cean Chaffin, concerns the investigative odyssey conducted by two F.B.I. agents (played by McCallany and Jonathan Groff) to “discover the brutal answers.”

AFI Fest 2012: A Hijacking and Berberian Sound Studio

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AFI Fest 2012: <em>A Hijacking</em> and <em>Berberian Sound Studio</em>
AFI Fest 2012: <em>A Hijacking</em> and <em>Berberian Sound Studio</em>

The real world, or at least the attempt to transmit some finite aspect of it, has been the aim of many a film—that transcendental dream that the screen is a window to the world and a movie can provide an authentic experience of it. Danish writer-director Tobias Lindholm searches for that authenticity in A Hijacking, a dramatic story of modern-day naval piracy that was actually shot off the pirate-prone coast of eastern Africa. Some of that verisimilitude finds its way onto the screen, and there are successes in conveying the harrowing experience of a crew in captivity. But as with any grasp toward the real, there are fractures and questions and facets of the story left unexplored.

The film traces the fate of a cargo vessel hijacked by Somali pirates through the eyes of the ship’s cook, Mikkel (Johan Philip Asbæk); we bounce intermittently from the ship back to the home office in Denmark, where shipping CEO Peter (Søren Malling) tries to negotiate for the release of the ship and its crew. We alternate between their perspectives as the days of the standoff drag on into weeks and then months. It’s a study in contrasts, as both men attempt to maintain their resolve under what the film regards as different yet connected kinds of tension.

Thessaloniki International Film Festival 2012: A Hijacking

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Thessaloniki International Film Festival 2012: <em>A Hijacking</em>
Thessaloniki International Film Festival 2012: <em>A Hijacking</em>

Down in Thessaloniki on FIPRESCI jury duty, constantly fighting the urge to play hooky and go on a reckless booze-and-baklava binge, I somehow managed to hit the fest off with a terrific choice: Tobias Lindholm’s A Hijacking. As much a nail-biting thriller as an experiment in narrative dualism, the movie tells the story of a Danish vessel taken hostage by a group of Somali terrorists somewhere on the Indian Ocean. The subsequent ransom negotiations between the hijackers and the shipping company form a push-pull pattern that could seem all too familiar, save for one detail: The drama’s two key participants never meet each other, nor do they share the same screen space.

Rotterdam @ BAM: R

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Rotterdam @ BAM: <em>R</em>
Rotterdam @ BAM: <em>R</em>

Committed to carrying on the tradition of Dogme 95, directors Michael Noer and Tobias Lindholm wanted to create a prison drama that did not rely on outworn clichés (noble prisoners, evil guards, escape attempts, hope triumphing, etc.) but was an attempt to capture the reality of prison life through one man’s subject experience. With R, a movie which plays like something out of Kafka, they have done just that.

Prisoner “R” has been incarcerated for violent assault. It is his first conviction so he is, naturally, terrified of what awaits him in Horsens State Prison (a notorious tough penitentiary in Denmark, now closed; R was filmed on location there). Hand-held camera follow R through the humiliating dehumanizing intake process (the strip search, the surrender of personal objects), and then up into the ward which now will be his home. R has been placed with hard-core lifers, prisoners who are fully institutionalized, giant blunt-edged muscled men, who stare at the more slight figure of R, with his bleached hair and handsome face (the actor is a dead ringer for Kurt Cobain), as though he is bait. They practically drool as he goes by.