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Don't Go Breaking My Heart (#110 of 2)

Toronto International Film Festival 2014 Pasolini, Tales, & Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2

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Toronto International Film Festival 2014: Pasolini, Tales, & Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2
Toronto International Film Festival 2014: Pasolini, Tales, & Don’t Go Breaking My Heart 2

Abel Ferrara’s Pasolini may not be the finest film playing at Toronto this year, but this wholly unconventional biopic manages to stick in the brain like few I’ve seen so far. Taking for its subject only the last day of Pier Paolo Pasolini’s life, the film should, by normal generic conventions, be nothing more than foreshadowing for Pasolini’s grisly murder. Instead, it’s almost defiantly banal, focused on the simple tasks of making art, such as reviewing rushes, typing and revising copy, and workshopping ideas with peers and loved ones. In terms of commitment and research and all the other method trappings that turn real lives into showboating for actors, Willem Dafoe brings little more than his slight resemblance to Pasolini, an extraordinarily freeing decision that, in classic Ferrara style, deliberately foregrounds the actor’s own identity along with the character’s, making plain the work of acting just as the film itself looks at the other elements of artistic production.

San Diego Asian Film Festival 2011: Don’t Go Breaking My Heart, Ninja Kids!!!, Aftershock, & A City of Sadness

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San Diego Asian Film Festival 2011: <em>Don’t Go Breaking My Heart</em>, <em>Ninja Kids!!!</em>, <em>Aftershock</em>, & <em>A City of Sadness</em>
San Diego Asian Film Festival 2011: <em>Don’t Go Breaking My Heart</em>, <em>Ninja Kids!!!</em>, <em>Aftershock</em>, & <em>A City of Sadness</em>

Don’t Go Breaking My Heart. Not simply a house of mirrors reflecting the soullessness of our Internet age, each sprawling urban surface in Johnnie To and Wai Ka-fai’s effortless romantic comedy Don’t Go Breaking My Heart is a potential window to heartfelt emotional connection. This great Hong Kong directing duo, known primarily for directing balletic actioneers, tweaks the standard conventions of the genre to make the love triangle between a downtrodden architect (Daniel Wu), a mid-level worker bee (Yuanyuan Gao), and a womanizing C.E.O. (Louis Koo) feel altogether fresh. The most notable subversion comes during the traditional meet-cute sequences where two characters see each other for the first time from their office windows, flirting via vaudeville-like performances and mosaics painted with colorful Post-it Notes. It’s a lovely visual motif that favors space and distance as opposed to the classic verbal diarrhea most American romantic comedies use as a crutch. Throughout Don’t Go Breaking My Heart, relationships are created with physical movement yet emotions are transferred through modern-day technology. In this sense, To and Wai establish a seamless relationship between camera, perspective, and space, allowing the charms of each character to flourish from afar, in poetic buffoonery. Considering the film’s glassy mise-en-scène, layers of physical space often misdirect point of view, primarily because of angle, complicating emotional entanglements in a wonderfully postmodern way. I can’t think of a cinematic concrete jungle that is this moonstruck.