House Logo

Kevin Jerome Everson (#110 of 3)

Olhar de Cinema Film Festival 2017 Rey, Soldado, Tonsler Park, All the Cities of the North, A Quiet Dream, & More

Comments Comments (...)

Olhar de Cinema Film Festival 2017: Rey, Soldado, Tonsler Park, All the Cities of the North, A Quiet Dream, & More

Diluvio

Olhar de Cinema Film Festival 2017: Rey, Soldado, Tonsler Park, All the Cities of the North, A Quiet Dream, & More

The Olhar de Cinema film festival, which has taken place since 2012 in Curitiba, Brazil, takes its name from the Portuguese word that means “to watch.” It’s practically a motto. The festival consists of two venues in two different shopping malls that are less than one block apart from each other. As such, directors, organizers, programmers, critics, and audiences from all over the world are constantly crossing paths, sparking conversations about the programmed films and the world of cinema at large. Like Locarno, this is a festival that doesn’t aim at the stars or glamour, and so the air around the venues is often filled with lively conversations—in Portuguese, English, and Spanish—about filmmakers who are destined for great futures.

Rotterdam 2013: The Island of St. Matthews and It Felt Like Love

Comments Comments (...)

Rotterdam 2013: <em>The Island of St. Matthews</em> and <em>It Felt Like Love</em>
Rotterdam 2013: <em>The Island of St. Matthews</em> and <em>It Felt Like Love</em>

Kevin Jerome Everson introduced the world premiere of his 10th film, The Island of St. Matthews, at Rotterdam by saying that it’s like the others, but different: a familiar subject matter (“black folks in America,” as he put it) approached with a unique method. Indeed, his latest feature, shot on 16mm, is an unusual blend of documentary and avant-garde modes that broaches the historical, the theological, the economic, and the personal. A series of staged actualités sets the film into motion: a man walks along the top of a dam wall; another water skis along the Tombigbee River that runs alongside the Everson family’s town of Westport, Mississippi; others, draped in anachronistic white robes, perform a baptism; another tolls the bell of St. Matthews Church. Everson’s poetic sound design makes these disparate scenes, like postcards from a bygone era, glide into one another and, later, function as a sort of chorus in between verses of talking heads.

Toronto International Film Festival 2011: Twenty Cigarettes, Good Bye, Wavelengths 3: Serial Rhythms, & Elena

Comments Comments (...)

Toronto International Film Festival 2011: <em>Twenty Cigarettes</em>, <em>Good Bye</em>, <em>Wavelengths 3: Serial Rhythms</em>, & <em>Elena</em>
Toronto International Film Festival 2011: <em>Twenty Cigarettes</em>, <em>Good Bye</em>, <em>Wavelengths 3: Serial Rhythms</em>, & <em>Elena</em>

Twenty Cigarettes: After pushing digital for its durational benefits in the extended shots of Ruhr, James Benning returns in HD to the theoretical ground of RR and modulates it to great effect: Where his examination of trains worked from a triangular relationship between object, time, and camera placement, Twenty Cigarettes shifts the framework by conflating the spatial and temporal elements; it’s no longer a question of length of train versus distance of camera, but of length of cigarette, which, because of the added variable of a human subject, is both a spatial and temporal measure. The effect of this mingling is a setup that, for all the feigned passivity of its production (Benning set the camera up, handed the subject a cigarette, hit record, and walked away), strikes a unique balance of agency between the camera and what’s in front of it, one which brings into questions the limits of control of both.