Comic Con (#110 of 8)

Box Office Rap The Wolverine and Post-Comic-Con Malaise

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Box Office Rap: The Wolverine and Post-Comic-Con Malaise
Box Office Rap: The Wolverine and Post-Comic-Con Malaise

While DC and Warner Bros. stole headlines this past weekend with plans to integrate Batman into Man of Steel 2 (a.k.a. Batman vs. Superman, or vice versa, as writer David S. Goyer confirmed), it's Marvel and 20th Century Fox that look to immediately capitalize on all the geekdom hoopla this weekend with The Wolverine, the second standalone film for Hugh Jackman's titular X-Man, which has made him one of the highest paid actors in Hollywood. What's changed since the release of X-Men Origins: Wolverine just four years ago? For starters, it appears that Fox has abandoned plans to make standalone films for each of their comic-book properties, instead offering X-Men: First Class as a means to reboot the entire franchise, while anchoring Wolverine on his own for two films until…wait for it…X-Men: Days of Future Past, which will finally bring all of our favorite mutants together again, marking four X-Men films in just six years.

Poster Lab: Man of Steel

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Poster Lab: <em>Man of Steel</em>
Poster Lab: <em>Man of Steel</em>

Though elegant and pristine in all its shadows and shimmer, the new poster for Man of Steel is an exercise in tedium, proving more unwelcome than exciting in a summer that just saw Spider-Man rebooted. Truly testing the limits of tolerance in a superhero-saturated culture, this design and the film it's touting reek of yesterday's news, like a back issue of the Daily Planet made into shiny papier-mâché. Admittedly, there've been far worse teaser one-sheets released on the world, and this one, conceived by the fine folks at P+A, already trumps the simple, gleaming “S” that first announced Superman Returns. Caught an angle that's just right for showing off the Krypton native's pectorals, this image is striking for its sharp attention to detail, specifically in regard to the work that went into that revamped suit. What we see stretched across Superman's chest is more than just a familiar logo, it's a texture emblematic of the new film's title—the rubbery, unitard equivalent of chain mail. That's a neat trick, and the costume designers are no doubt thrilled to have their labors front and center, but damned if this doesn't echo the poster we just saw for The Amazing Spider-Man, another ad that zoomed in on the kinks of its hero's armor.