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Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 9, "Sock Puppets"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 9, "Sock Puppets"

JoJo Whilden/Showtime

Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 9, "Sock Puppets"

The real world is filled with differing ideas, opinions, and agendas, and to someone who wishes to control that world, this can be frustratingly inconvenient. Just look at how cheerful the usually gloomy Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham) seems in the latest episode of Homeland, “Sock Puppets,” as he's called into a meeting with President-elect Elizabeth Keane (Elizabeth Marvel), a former adversary who seems far more amenable to the man's policy proposals now that she's been fed false intelligence about the Iranians. Dar practically glows as he stops by the hotel room of Majid Javadi (Shaun Toub), the Iranian defector who lied to Keane at Dar's behest, so much so that Javadi even calls him out on it. Dar's downfall—and perhaps Homeland's—is in the way “Sock Puppets” sacrifices character development for the sake of scoring a few more points in that game, insisting on the accuracy of a single viewpoint instead of the ambiguity of differently motivated agents.

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 8, "Alt.Truth"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 8, "Alt.Truth"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 8, "Alt.Truth"

On his third tour overseas, Andrew Keane's (Ryan Shibley) unit was overrun by a barrage of sniper fire and rocket-propelled grenades. This soldier died a hero, a fact that's been inconvenient to Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham) and his cabal of war hawks, because it's given President-elect Elizabeth Keane (Elizabeth Marvel) a righteous, audience-pleasing “gold-star mother” narrative in the media. Tonight's episode of Homeland, “Alt.Truth,” eerily and effectively depicts how such stories can be readily orchestrated and flipped on a dime, and rarely for the better good. It's in Real Truth host Brett O'Keefe (Jake Weber) manipulating the reality of Andrew's demise, running a sort of retcon game for his right-wing audience; in Majid Javadi (Shaun Toub) shamelessly turning on his country, Saul (Mandy Patinkin), and the truth for personal gain; and Peter Quinn (Rupert Friend) again suffering the consequences of taking stock of the wrong truth behind his paranoia.

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 7, "Imminent Risk"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 7, "Imminent Risk"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 7, "Imminent Risk"

From the moment Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham) first met President-elect Keane (Elizabeth Marvel) in Homeland's season-six premiere episode, “Fair Game,” he's been convinced that she poses a threat to American sovereignty. It's appropriate, then, that when he tunes into Keane's latest interview with ABC reporter Martha Raddatz, she's opening up about her soldier son and their differing opinions on the war that would later claim his life: “He was doing what he believed was right, and I was doing what I believed was right.”

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 6, "The Return"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 6, "The Return"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 6, "The Return"

The first words spoken in the opening credits for Homeland's sixth season are from Gil Scott-Heron's 1970 song “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”: “The first revolution is when you change your mind about how you look at things and see that there might be another way to look at it that you have not been shown.” This is the central conceit of tonight's episode, “The Return,” in which almost every protagonist challenges the convenient narratives being fed to them and comes to accept a new and radical point of view.

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 5, "Casus Belli"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 5, "Casus Belli"

JoJo Whilden/Showtime

Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 5, "Casus Belli"

In a perfectly logical and reasonable world, Peter Quinn (Rupert Friend) would immediately make the connection between the footage of the exploded Medina Medley van at the epicenter of an explosion in New York City and the photos he'd taken the night before, of the man across the street who he believes has been surveilling Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes). But how much room is left for logic in the wake of a major terrorist attack?

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 4, "A Flash of Light"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 4, "A Flash of Light"

JoJo Whilden/Showtime

Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 4, "A Flash of Light"

Up until the literally explosive final two minutes of “A Flash of Light,” Homeland's sixth season has taken a radically different approach to its narrative. Rather than dealing with an immediate threat, the series has revolved around the hypothetical threat of a nuclear attack, one that's at worst still several years down the road. Instead of establishing an obvious villain, the series has criticized the FBI for essentially inventing homegrown terrorists like Sekou Bah (J. Mallory McCree) and suggested that Mossad might also be fabricating threats with the use of false-flag operatives like Iranian moneyman Farhad Nafisi (Bernard White). The people doing all the threatening in this episode are the ones who're supposed to be the good guys: the CIA's Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham), casually accosting Carrie Matheson (Claire Danes) as she picks her daughter up from school, and the Israeli government's Etai Luskin (Allan Corduner), politely detaining Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin) on his way back to America from the West Bank.

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 3, "The Covenant"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 3, "The Covenant"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 3, "The Covenant"

In “The Covenant,” when Dar Adal (F. Murray Abraham) uses the word “conclusive” to describe the findings of his Abu Dhabi operative, Saul Berenson (Mandy Patinkin), Carrie (Claire Danes) knows that something isn't right. A true intelligence officer would never speak so decisively; they prefer to hedge their bets, as Carrie explains to President-elect Elizabeth Keane (Elizabeth Marvel). Only those with an agenda to push would act so bluntly, and at its best, Homeland describes such dealings with subtle ambiguity.

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 2, "The Man in the Basement"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 2, "The Man in the Basement"

JoJo Whilden/Showtime

Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 2, "The Man in the Basement"

At the start of “The Man in the Basement,” both Peter Quinn (Rupert Friend) and Homeland are trapped in basements of their own making. Both have lost their connection to the outside world, and are wrapped up in scenarios of what Shakespeare once deemed “sound and fury, signifying nothing.” For Quinn, this means sitting in a dark room, drowning out the concerns of his housemate and caretaker Carrie Matheson (Claire Danes) by listening to right-wing conspiracy theorists, looking to make order from the chaos of his life. For Homeland, this means burying itself in small character moments that stand miles apart from the show's political thriller roots.

Homeland Recap Season 6, Episode 1, "Fair Game"

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Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 1, "Fair Game"

JoJo Whilden/Showtime

Homeland Recap: Season 6, Episode 1, "Fair Game"

The FBI, in full riot gear, breaks down the door to an apartment in the projects of New York City, screaming at a mother (Zainab Jah) and her daughter (Ashlei Sharpe Chestnut) to get down on the ground, the stove left unattended. The target is Seikou Bah (J. Mallory McCree), an intelligent, tech-savvy Muslim teenager who's been posting videos online that are critical of the United States government; when the family refuses to answer questions from the icy agent Ray Conlin (Dominic Fumusa) without a lawyer present, he abusively kicks them out of the apartment in the cold and dark of midnight so that his team can execute their search warrant. Under Keith Gordon's efficient direction, this entire sequence takes little over two minutes, and it's a jarring (and potentially critical) acknowledgment of the increasingly jingoistic actions America takes in order to protect itself.

Interview: Sanjit De Silva Talks Race, Acting, and His Role in Dry Powder

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Interview: Sanjit De Silva Talks Race, Acting, and His Role in Dry Powder
Interview: Sanjit De Silva Talks Race, Acting, and His Role in Dry Powder

“Finally I'm in a place where I'm doing the kind of work I want to do, and I'm being seen in the way that I want to be seen,” says Sri Lankan-born actor Sanjit De Silva. Landing the part of an American CEO in Sarah Burgess's new play, Dry Powder, a high-stakes financial drama which opens this week at the Public Theater, is a milestone in De Silva's decade-long career as a working actor in New York City. “I hope this trend continues,” he adds smiling.

De Silva left his native country in 1984 at age seven, not long after the outbreak of a civil war that would tear apart the South Asian nation for the next 30 years. (His parents each belonged to the opposing ethnic groups in the conflict, which made normal life untenable for them in the country.) After a brief stint in Africa, the family moved to America in 1986. Now based in Brooklyn, De Silva recently spoke to me about his experience establishing a career as an actor in his adopted country, both as an immigrant and a person of color, and about his current role in Dry Powder.