The House


A City Sleeps

A City Sleeps marks Harmonix's first foray outside of pure rhythm games like Frequency, Rock Band, and Dance Central. It's not that much of a stretch, though, as a bullet-hell shooter is all about recognizing and responding to patterns, and many of the enemies and bosses fire their weapons along with each level's beats. Of course, it's also not that much of a game, with much of its play time padded by the grueling repetition necessary to memorize the ever-harder versions or cursed constraints of its paltry three levels. In music terms, this is more of an EP than an LP, one that falls between both Savant: Ascent and Retro/Grade in both length and enjoyment.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: a city sleeps, harmonix, retrograde, savant: ascent


Mulholland Drive

1. "Why David Lynch's Mulholland Drive Is a Great Horror Film." For the Vulture, Bilge Ebiri explains why.

"This is about as perfect a 'horror' scene as one can imagine. The oddly floating camera, the strangely somnambulant delivery of the actors, the way they seem to be literally pulled towards the dumpster, the anticipation of the reveal. And, yes, the sound—that ever-present, Lynchian thrum that infects even the most mundane things with anticipation and dread. The scene also sets up this terrifying thing behind the dumpster—is it a hobo, a demon, or something else?—as being a pivotal figure, even though we only see him briefly a couple more times later in the film. ('He’s the one who’s doing it' is such a delectably vague statement.) So, right at the outset of Mulholland Drive, we have the suggestion of the supernatural and demonic, of something fantastical lurking beneath what seems, at least, at that point, to be a somewhat straightforward thriller."

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: bilge ebiri, blackwater, carrie, david lynch, ikea, jeremy scahill, kenneth lonergan, kieran culkin, mulholland drive, oscar de la renta, piper laurie, sarah jessica parker, the intercept, the shining, this is our youth, vulture


American Horror Story: Freak Show

With "Edward Mordrake (Part 1)," American Horror Story: Freak Show plays to its strengths, sounding its themes through action rather than talk. Jimmy's (Evan Peters) already reliably tedious, half-true blathering about the equality and sameness of freaks is mercifully limited to a speech given over Meep's funeral; mostly, we're allowed to regard the freaks simply as characters, with accompanying pleasures and demons, rather than as potential monuments to retrospective political actualization. Narratively, this episode's a mess, as it introduces half a dozen threads and is clearly doing a great deal of bookkeeping for the season at large. But this structural looseness, which favors vignettes that stand on their own, also affirms the central premise of aloneness: These characters are bundled together on a cramped makeshift campground yet they're emotionally solitary, trapped within their individual obsessions. "Edward Mordrake (Part 1)" is aware of the reassuring safety, and of the stifling social enclosure, of living with family.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: american horror story, american horror story: freak show, angela bassett, edward mordrake part 1, evan peters, jessica lange, katy bates, Michael Chiklis, recap, wes bentley


Keanu Reeves

1. "Keanu Reeves on Not Receiving More Offers from Hollywood: 'It Sucks.'" Keanu Reeves continues to star in fun new action movies. But he still wishes there were more offers on the table.

"No, it sucks, but it's just the way it is. You can have positive and negative experiences, but what I like about studios are the resources and the worlds that they can create. Obviously, a lot of good filmmakers work on studio movies. Even when I was working on studio movies more often, I was always doing independent movies. So for me, that was just not happening, but I want to keep going, making things, and telling stories. I want to be able to do that—to be an actor, a director, to produce, you know? If we're going to do a delineation between studio and independent [films], I was always hoping to do both."

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: brad pitt, Douchebag, eric hynes, how to get away with murder, issy stapleton, john wick, keanu reeves, kelli stapleton, mark harris, medium, michael mark cohen, new york film festival, reverse shot, scandal, Shonda Rhimes, the sopranos, toronto international film festival, zach galifianakis


Ben Bradlee

1. "Ben Bradlee R.I.P." The legendary Washington Post editor dies at 93.

"President Obama recalled Mr. Bradlee's legacy on Tuesday night in a statement that said: 'For Benjamin Bradlee, journalism was more than a profession—it was a public good vital to our democracy. A true newspaperman, he transformed the Washington Post into one of the country's finest newspapers, and with him at the helm, a growing army of reporters published the Pentagon Papers, exposed Watergate, and told stories that needed to be told—stories that helped us understand our world and one another a little bit better. The standard he set—a standard for honest, objective, meticulous reporting—encouraged so many others to enter the profession. And that standard is why, last year, I was proud to honor Ben with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Today, we offer our thoughts and prayers to Ben's family, and all who were fortunate to share in what truly was a good life.'"

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: 2001: a space odyssey, amanda hess, ben bradlee, bfi, elvis mitchell, interview magazine, r.i.p., ratatouille, renée zellweger, richard kelly, shia labeouf, slate, the a.v. club, the simpsons, the washington post, william hughes


Sons of Anarchy

Anyone familiar with the tenacious brutality of August Marks (Billy Brown) knew it was only a matter of time before he punished SAMCRO for all of their extracurricular tomfoolery. Often mentioned but rarely seen, Marks has loomed over this seventh and final season of Sons of Anarchy like a snake waiting for the right moment to strike. In "Greensleeves," the deceptively badass gangster from Oakland makes up for lost time by hitting Jax Teller (Charlie Hunnam) where it hurts most: at the center of his inner circle.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: Billy Brown, david labrava, greensleeves, katey satal, kenneth choi, Marilyn Manson, recap, Sons of Anarchy, theo rossi


Oscar de la Renta

1. "Fashion Designer Oscar de la Renta Dead at 82." He dressed some of the most famous women in the world and recently designed Amal Clooney's wedding dress.

"Oscar de la Renta, the legendary Dominican-American fashion designer, has died at age 82, ABC News has confirmed. De la Renta had been battling cancer. His work became the preferred wear for such first ladies as Nancy Reagan, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush, and he designed the dress worn by Amal Alamuddin at her wedding in September to George Clooney. Movie stars such as Jessica Chastain, Penelope Cruz and Kristen Stewart also were great fans of the designer. De la Renta was born in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic to a Dominican mother and a Puerto Rican father. At 18, he moved to Spain to study painting but then switched over to fashion, landing an apprenticeship with Spain's most renowned couturier, Cristobal Balenciaga. "Soon I found that I was more interested in fashion design than I was in continuing as an illustrator,' he once told the Toronto Star. 'I think that any experience you have; anything you pay attention to is part of what I call the 'baggage' you carry with you all your life. My early involvement with painting, even the fact that I come from a tropical country, are part of who and what I am today.'"

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: andy greenwald, arthur chu, chris ryan, david holzman's diary, David Mackenzie, doctor strange, fury, glenn heath jr., grantland, interview magazine, julianne moore, L.M. Kit Carson, oscar de la renta, r.i.p., sarah paulson, the knick


Misty Upham

1. "Arnaud Desplechin Remembers Misty Upham." A tribute to the actress he directed in Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian.

"The death of Misty Upham is bottomless sorrow. I loved this woman as if she were my younger sister. The press talk about her fragility; I know Misty had that rare gift of being able to offer fragility to the camera, and it gave her a force without limit. Misty had a great soul, and she gave that soul to the film. I don't know why tonight, I think about Marilyn Monroe. Probably because in these two actresses, I see a sense of tragedy and how their wounds turned into gifts—joy, pain, innocence, wildness mixed. Each of them trembling upsets us. And it is hard work that transforms fears and uncertainties into art. I remember our first meeting. I told her about my unreserved admiration for Frozen River. I had been dazzled: Lila was invulnerable as she was almost blind. With glasses, healed, the woman suddenly became very shy. It was her blindness that protected her from the world! When I told her this, Misty jumped on my neck! She could not believe that a European film buff had been able to see what she had done so secretly and subtly."

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: alan bean plus four, arnaud desplechin, chuck bowen, david lynch, denzel washington, fandor, hannibal, keith uhlich, liam neeson, Misty Upham, nick pinkerton, niles schwartz, paley center for media, the new yorker, tom hanks, twin peaks


Doctor Who

Hot on the heels of last week's "Mummy on the Orient Express," new writer Jamie Mathieson delivers an intriguing and suspenseful standalone episode with "Flatline." He certainly knows how to start a story with a good visual hook, as the Doctor (Peter Capaldi) and Clara (Jenna Coleman) land in present-day Bristol and find themselves struggling to emerge from a police box that's suddenly shrunk to half its normal height. There's a refreshingly old-school feel to the episode in that the Doctor has no prior knowledge of what's going on, in contrast to much of the past few seasons (as he says to Clara, "Could you not just let me enjoy this moment of not knowing something? They happen so rarely"). Thanks to the TARDIS shrinking even further, the Doctor becomes trapped inside until the end of the episode, able only to offer advice and the occasional bit of equipment as Clara does the legwork, carrying the TARDIS with her in her handbag. The shots of the Doctor's face filling the tiny doorway, or his hand reaching out of the little police box, are equal parts funny and slightly disturbing.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: doctor who, douglas mackinnon, flatline, jamie mathieson, jenna coleman, jovian wade, michelle gomez, peter capaldi, planet of giants, recap, Samuel Anderson


The Walking Dead

Though there's no denying the thrilling and unsettling power of the last two to three minutes of "Strangers," it would be incorrect to label the episode as all build-up. In fact, the image of Gareth (Andrew J. West) chowing down on a hunk of Bob's (Lawrence Gilliard Jr.) leg meat while casually explaining away his barbarism wasn't even the episode's most remarkable moment. Rather, it was a short excursion into town to pick up supplies that yielded one of the more emotionally revealing reactions in the aftermath of Terminus and the return of Carol (Melissa McBride).

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: andrew j. west, andrew lincoln, chandler riggs, josh mcdermitt, lawrence gilliard jr., melissa mcbride, Michael Cudlitz, norman reedus, recap, seth gilliam, strangers, the walking dead






The HouseCategories



The HouseThe Attic

More »



Site by  Docent Solutions