The House


Katy Perry

The Ke$ha-grade "This Is How We Do" is the weakest single from Katy Perry's Prism album so far (we're still waiting for "Walking on Air" to get a proper release), but the music video for the track, directed by Joel Kefali, offers up eye candy aplenty. Perry gets her artpop on in the new clip, inspired by the Dutch De Stijl art movement and mod fashion, including Yves Saint Laurent's iconic color-blocked day dress from 1965, '80s pastels, and nods to Michael Jordan, Aretha Franklin, and Mariah Carey, who appears in a pseudo-cameo via a not-so-flattering impersonator (Perry slyly shaded Mimi at a "throwback" in a recent interview). Elsewhere, Perry's male dancers get their groove on donning Pee-wee Herman's famous gray suit, outdone only by a twerking ice-cream cone. Watch the video below:

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: joel kefali, katy perry, mariah carey, music video, pee-wee herman, prism, this is how we do, walking on air, yves saint laurent


Robert Drew

1. "Robert Drew, Cinema Verite Documentarian, Dies at 90." His son Thatcher Drew confirmed he died on Wednesday at his home in Sharon, Connecticut.

"Filmmaker Robert Drew, a pioneer of the modern documentary who in Primary and other movies mastered the intimate, spontaneous style known as cinema verite and schooled a generation of influential directors that included D.A. Pennebaker and Albert Maysles, has died at age 90. His son Thatcher Drew confirmed he died Wednesday at his home in Sharon, Connecticut. Starting in 1960 with Primary, Mr. Drew produced and sometimes directed a series of television documentaries that took advantage of such innovations as light hand-held cameras that recorded sound and pictures. With filmmakers newly unburdened, nonfiction movies no longer had to be carefully staged and awkwardly narrated. Directors could work more like journalists, following their subjects for hours and days at a time and capturing revealing moments."

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: amy nicholson, blossom, brian eno, david byrne, dick smith, israel, luc besson, lucy, palestine, primary, richard brody, robert drew, willa paskin


Starry Eyes

Why are they laughing? This was the question I posed to my colleague as the lights rose in the DB Clarke Theatre, at the end of my first screening of the 2014 Fantasia Film Festival. We'd just endured a rather bleak horror film called Starry Eyes, and I was confounded by the atmosphere in the room—an air of revelry better suited to a midnight presentation of The Rocky Horror Picture Show than an amateur feature's Canadian premiere. I was duly warned, upon arriving in Montreal that afternoon, that Fantasia is resolutely a people's festival, which is to say that its spirit resides in the pleasure of the crowd. And certainly a paying audience is free to enjoy whatever delights a film affords them. Horror films, in particular, tend to draw out the boisterous, and I suppose I shouldn't have been surprised that a room of eager Montrealers could hardly suppress their guffaws. And yet it seemed to me that before a crowd this rowdy, Starry Eyes didn't stand much of a chance. As the film heaved into action, its seriousness was clearly at odds with the levity the room had anticipated. Nobody cared. The hoots and titters passed through the room like a chill.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: alexandra essoe, cybernatural, david cronenberg, david lynch, dennis widmyer, fantasia international film festival, kevin kolsch, leo gabriadze, mulholland drive, shelly hennig, starry eyes, videodrome


Lana Del Rey

Lana Del Rey has unveiled the music video for the standout title track from her latest album, Ultraviolence. Donning an understated wedding dress, the singer strolls casually through a garden, peeling an orange and putting the succulent fruit to her pillowy lips, and nibbling on the cameraman's fingers. (We never see him, so it's unclear if it's her groom or someone else.) Directed by Francesco Corrozzini and shot in handheld, Super 8-style, "Ultraviolence" is a throwback to Del Rey's early DIY videos. She's proven she can do high-pitched narratives well (see "Tropico"), but the new video is another reminder that she excels at low-concept too.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: francesco corrozzini, lana del rey, music video, ultraviolence


The Big Chill

1. "The Big Chill: These Are Your Parents." Lena Dunham on the Lawrence Kasdan film.

"You will grow up with certain friends who have been chosen for you purely because your parents don't mind sitting in lawn chairs next to their parents, can find something to talk about. Sometimes your mother will even see the other mothers socially, put on a bunch of gold rings and spray perfume in her henna-red hair and head out the door to meet them at ten past seven for a glass of wine. But you will know the difference between those friends and these old friends, these primal friends, these friends as entrenched as bone. You will know the difference even though you can't articulate it. You will just know that when they get together, whenever that is, the cadence of their speech changes, their laughs go up a register, they throw their heads back and shake their hair and that laughter comes unbidden, and at surprising times, and about things you don't think are funny. The laughter is catching, and soon the guys are laughing too, outside by the grill, ignoring their kids and letting the laughter move them. Their eyes soften and their foreheads smooth. They look like old photos."

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: david pierce, e.t., John Oliver, last week tonight, lena dunham, neil genzlinger, piracy, sam adams, star wars, steven boone, the big chill, the expendables 3, the verge, will mckinley


What Is Public?

1. "What Is Public?" Anil Dash on how the answer isn't so simple.

"It has so quickly become acceptable practice within mainstream web publishing companies to reuse people's tweets as the substance of an article that special tools have sprung up to help them do so. But inside these newsrooms, there is no apparent debate over whether it's any different to embed a tweet from the President of the United States or from a vulnerable young activist who might not have anticipated her words being attached to her real identity, where she can be targeted by anonymous harassers. What if the public speech on Facebook and Twitter is more akin to a conversation happening between two people at a restaurant? Or two people speaking quietly at home, albeit near a window that happens to be open to the street? And if more than a billion people are active on various social networking applications each week, are we saying that there are now a billion public figures? When did we agree to let media redefine everyone who uses social networks as fair game, with no recourse and no framework for consent?"

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: anil dash, Benedict Fitzgerald, bryan curtis, comic-con, devin faraci, Don Weis, grantland, indiana jones and the temple of doom, nick pinkerton, steven spielberg, the passion of the christ


So Many Me

There's a very fine line between having too much and so much of a good thing, and the clone-filled So Many Me is determined to live on that edge. Deceptively cute, at least until the game gets one of its many spike-lined hooks into you, its 50 levels are bursting at the seams with the sort of perplexing puzzles and perilous platforming that make for great ad copy—at least until they grow taxingly lengthy and get weighed down by wonky controls that stand in the way of execution. (And that's ignoring the stray accidental solution, in which a glitch allows you to shortcut through a zone.) In terms of polish on an indie game, So Many Me is somewhere between Ethan: Meteor Hunter and Battleblock Theater, but these frustrations keep the game's heroic green blob from being the next Kirby.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: battleblock theater, blocks that matter, ethan: meteor hunter, origo games, so many me


TMZ

1. "The Down and Dirty History of TMZ." How a lawyer from the San Fernando Valley created a gossip empire and transformed himself into the most feared man in Hollywood, all by breaking a few long-held rules and, as rumor has it, lording over a notorious vault full of secrets.

"Accounts of [Harvey] Levin suggest that he's driven far less by a desire for personal fame and much more by a generalized, all-encompassing hunger: to be the best, to dominate the industry, to prove his naysayers wrong. He's a man of extremes (in the '90s, he was overweight; today, he's incredibly fit, doesn't drink, sleeps four hours a night, and looks younger than his 63 years). Former employees describe him as a 'mad genius,' 'all fast-twitch muscle,' and 'like he's taking the blue pills in Bourne Identity.' And it's that metabolism and bottomless hunger that's manifested in the site: When people call it all-consuming, they're both referring to its domination of its corner of the gossip landscape and the way it dominates the lives of its employees, including Levin himself."

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: Angelo Badalamenti, comic-con, david lynch, east village, garry winogrand, harvey levin, Julee Cruise, kim's video & music, mark feeney, metropolitan museum of art, sexual harassment, the boston globe, tmz, twin peak


The Leftovers

Three minutes into "Gladys," the titular member of Guilty Remnant is dead. The episode's central event, her brutal murder, is already in the past. And in the long unwinding that follows, as the emotional, social, and political consequences of that terrible act reverberate through Mapleton and beyond, the gulf between those who need to remember the Sudden Departure and those who wish to forget it grows ever larger. "Grace period is over," Holy Wayne (Paterson Joseph) warned in the show's pilot, and though he meant to suggest the transformative power of his own charismatic presence, tonight's episode demonstrates the broader implications of his foreboding words. The chronological conceit of the series, picking up the thread of October 14th three years later, suddenly appears canny indeed. With "Gladys," an enthralling portrait of what happens when the urge to move on collides with the persistence of grief, The Leftovers joins the ranks of television's must-see dramas.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: Amy Brenneman, ann dowd, Christopher Eccleston, gladys, Justin Theroux, liv tyler, marceline hugot, margaret qualley, recap, the leftovers


Residue

"We are all the residue of our past," Jumagul tells his grandson in the first act of Residue. The platitude sets a bland tone that this side-scrolling platformer never overcomes. While moving from checkpoint to checkpoint, you play as one of three characters: flashlight-shining Jumagul; Emilio, a boy who can jump, swim, and climb; and Nikolai, a man with a grappling hook. Controlling these characters rarely feels fluid, but Residue wants to be less about player skill and more about discovering the nuances of its story. As you pass obstacles and explore the levels, you find various documents and trigger flashbacks of a sort that provide background about the setting and characters. Unfortunately, the game's sluggish controls often distract from the seriousness of the story; watching yourself struggle with Nikolai's grappling hook is, at best, bad comedy. The worst scene amounts to the player running Jumagul and Nikolai into each other to "create" a fight, a silly section of gameplay that kills the possibility of believable drama.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: residue, the working parts






The HouseCategories



The HouseThe Attic

More »



Site by  Docent Solutions