The House


Jennifer Lopez and Iggy Azalea

Jennifer Lopez's eighth studio album, A.K.A., may have bombed, but the singer is evidently not giving up. Instead, she's giving butt. (Sorry, I couldn't resist.) Her collaboration with the red-hot Iggy Azalea on the single-worthy "Acting Like That" was probably her best bet for a rebound, but we'll have to settle for the "Booty" remix, which also features the Aussie model turned rapper. The duo premiered the music video for the track tonight, and there are few surprises: The clip, directed by video veteran Hype Williams, features copious swimsuits and fishnet stockings, twerking, booty-popping, and lots and lots of gelatinous grease. It's unlikely to reignite interest in Lopez's music career, but the video is sure to rack up plenty of views, as the fortysomething mommy of two more than holds her own alongside the 24-year-old Azalea's self-proclaimed "high-fashion booty." Watch it below:

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TAGS: a.k.a., booty, hype williams, iggy azalea, jennifer lopez


Charles Chaplin

1. "The Brave Open Letter Graham Greene Wrote Defending Charlie Chaplin from McCarthy." To mark its 100th anniversary, The New Republic is republishing a collection of its most memorable articles. This piece, an open letter from Greene in defense of his friend against McCarthy and his cronies, was published on October 13, 1952.

"I can't figure out why other people like it. I know why I like it. I know the things that were interesting that kept coming up in conversations. And then also, to work on a script with the person who wrote the novel, that can be a gift. There can also be a lot of frustration. Or certainly it can be perceived that way. Will this person be able to see the forest for the trees? Or will they be so wed to how difficult it was to make this storyline work that they're not willing to jettison certain elements when it doesn't? I know that's a commonly-held philosophy about novelists. But with Gillian, it couldn't be further from the truth. She has—and David Koepp has it too—that love of where the audience is in the narrative. She was very good at taking things that were 13 chapters into the book and saying, well that could be in the introduction. She picked out the traits that needed to be dramatised, but didn't necessarily put them in the same chronological order."

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TAGS: adrian peterson, charles chaplin, cold sweat: my father james brown and me, graham greene, james brown, john green, joseph mccarthy, nathan rabin, rian johnson, robin gaby fisher, terry gilliam, the fault in our stars, todd vanderwerff, transparent, yamma brown


David Fincher

1. "David Fincher Interview." Ahead of his highly anticipated adaptation of Gillian Flynn's psychological best-seller, Gone Girl, LWLies is granted an audience with director David Fincher.

"I can't figure out why other people like it. I know why I like it. I know the things that were interesting that kept coming up in conversations. And then also, to work on a script with the person who wrote the novel, that can be a gift. There can also be a lot of frustration. Or certainly it can be perceived that way. Will this person be able to see the forest for the trees? Or will they be so wed to how difficult it was to make this storyline work that they're not willing to jettison certain elements when it doesn't? I know that's a commonly-held philosophy about novelists. But with Gillian, it couldn't be further from the truth. She has—and David Koepp has it too—that love of where the audience is in the narrative. She was very good at taking things that were 13 chapters into the book and saying, well that could be in the introduction. She picked out the traits that needed to be dramatised, but didn't necessarily put them in the same chronological order."

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TAGS: bilge ebiri, claire denis, david fincher, david lynch, eraserhead, gone girl, jacob hall, little white lies, netflix, sam adams, screncrush, the hunger games: mockingjay, the texas chainsaw massacre, tobe hooper, wim wenders


Sons of Anarchy

Chess pieces move and bodies drop. One could easily imagine Jax Teller (Charlie Hunnam) having this credo tattooed onto his perfectly sculpted chest as a reminder of his Machiavellian ways. Sons of Anarchy has mastered this kind of cause and effect one head shot at a time. Cagey strategies occasionally play a role in taking out enemies foreign and domestic, but SAMCRO prefers all-out blitzkrieg.

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TAGS: Annabeth Gish, Billy Gierhart, charlie hunnam, Drea de Matteo, jimmy smits, Katey Sagal, kenneth choi, peter weller, recap, rockmond dunbar, Sons of Anarchy, theo rossi, toil and till


Robin Thicke

1. "Robin Thicke Admits Drug Abuse, Lying to Media in Wild 'Blurred Lines' Deposition (Exclusive)." Interrogated for allegedly ripping off Marvin Gaye, the singer attempts a rock 'n' roll defense: "I didn't do a single interview last year without being high"

"Thicke says he was just 'lucky enough to be in the room' when [Pharrell] Williams wrote the song. Afterward, he gave interviews to outlets like Billboard where he repeated the false origin story surrounding 'Blurred Lines' because he says he 'thought it would help sell records.' But he also states he hardly remembers his specific media comments because he 'had a drug and alcohol problem for the year' and 'didn't do a sober interview.' In fact, when he appeared on Oprah Winfrey's show with his young son and talked about how weird it was to be in the midst of a legal battle with the family of a legendary soul singer who 'inspires almost half of my music,' Thicke admits he was drunk and taking Norco—'which is like two Vicodin in one pill,' he says."

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TAGS: alaska, annette insdorf, blurred lines, canon, jewish, jonathan glazer, leonard maltin, matt zoller seitz, poland, rape, Robin Thicke, rogerebert.com, tony auth


Doctor Who

Since taking over Doctor Who in 2010, showrunner Steven Moffat has been preoccupied with writing the "big" episodes—season openers, finales, Christmas specials, and so on—which have dwelled on major turning points in the Doctor's life. This year, he deliberately reserved a slot in the schedule where he could tell a small-scale story filled with the kind of creepiness he displayed during the Russell T Davies era, with episodes like 2005's "The Empty Child" and 2007's "Blink." Rather than simply duplicate his past successes, though, "Listen" combines the two approaches—big and small—to produce the best episode of the season so far.

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TAGS: doctor who, jenna coleman, listen, peter capaldi, recap, remi gooding, Samuel Anderson, steven moffat


The Imitation Game

1. "The Imitation Game wins Toronto top prize." The Alan Turing biopic has won the People's Choice award at the Toronto Film Festival.

"Sherlock star Benedict Cumberbatch stars in the drama about the British code breaker who helped decrypt the Enigma machine during World War Two. In a message, director Morten Tyldum said it was 'an amazing honour' to win the prize. 'For film fans to support The Imitation Game means so much to me, the entire cast and film-making team,' he said. Turing was credited with bringing about the end of the war and saving hundreds of thousands of lives after decoding German Naval messages. He is also considered to be the founding father of the modern-day computer. However his later life was overshadowed after a conviction in 1952 for gross indecency when homosexuality was illegal in Britain. He was chemically castrated and committed suicide in 1954. Earlier this week Tyldum described the film as 'a tribute to being different'."

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TAGS: a.o. scott, Adam Sternbergh, alan turing, amy taubin, andrew o'hehir, benedict cumberbatch, david fincher, film comment, gone girl, lena dunham, serena, slate, the imitation game, toronto international film festival, vulture


The Knick

The Knickerbocker Hospital's putative mission to help New York City's neediest gets its most interesting stress test yet in "They Capture the Heat." An earlier episode of The Knick showed hospital administrator Herman Barrow (Jeremy Bobb) getting his teeth plied out by his loan shark, Bunkie (Danny Hoch); now, one of Bunkie's lieutenants may need his leg amputated in the dead of the night, putting his boss in Barrow's debt for once. After seeing Dr. Algernon Edwards (Andre Holland) scrub in for surgery, Bunkie tells Barrow, "That black bastard better not get too familiar with my man if he don't wanna find himself hanging from a lamppost," and both Algernon and Thackery narrow their eyes in unspoken disgust—a flicker of solidarity between the two men never before seen in the hospital's surgical theater. It's a collision of two of the show's up-to-now isolated environs, and even Clive Owen's haggard, seen-it-all drug addict Dr. Thackery manages to be appalled by the stench surrounding Bunkie. It's been a pleasure watching Steven Soderbergh stress Thackery and Algernon's unspoken shifts in opinion of one another, and "They Capture the Heat" skirts it on the margins.

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TAGS: andre holland, Cara Seymour, chris sullivan, clive owen, colin meath, Danny Hoch, Eric Johnson, jeremy bobb, Juliet Rylance, michael angaro, recap, the knick, they capture the heat


ISIS

1. "Legal Authority for Fighting ISIS." The New York Times editorial board hammers Congress, Obama over ISIS war.

"The cowardice in Congress, never to be underestimated, is outrageous. Some lawmakers have made it known that they would rather not face a war authorization vote shortly before midterm elections, saying they'd rather sit on the fence for a while to see whether an expanded military campaign starts looking like a success story or a debacle. By avoiding responsibility, they allow President Obama free rein to set a dangerous precedent that will last well past this particular military campaign. Mr. Obama, who has spent much of his presidency seeking to wean the United States off a perpetual state of war, is now putting forward unjustifiable interpretations of the executive branch's authority to use military force without explicit approval from Congress."

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TAGS: apple, barack obama, cannes film festival, forbes, Isis, jessie ware, lars von trier, luke white, metamorphosis, new york magazine, nick pinkerton, nymphomaniac, remi weekes, reverse shot, say you love me, snowpiercer, songs of innocence, stray dogs, tell no one, the new york times, tsai ming-liang, u2, venice film festival


Eden

Filled with retro house cuts, Eden insists upon a good time whenever Paul (Félix de Givry) or his DJ peers spin in various house parties and clubs, yet the prevailing atmosphere of Mia Hansen-Løve's film is melancholic. One of the more sensitive contemporary directors of youth, Hansen-Løve flips the dynamic of Goodbye, First Love, a film in which the passage of time is keenly felt in the protagonist's maturation and regression occurs from the reintroduction of outside elements. In this film, it's everything around Paul that changes and outpaces him while he remains resolutely, depressingly, the same person at 34 that he was at 20.

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TAGS: daft punk, eden, félix de givry, gael garcía bernal, jauja, jon stewart, Kim Bodnia, lisandro alonso, liverpool, mia hansen-løve, rosewater, the daily show, toronto international film festival, viggo mortensen






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