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Safdie Brothers’ Good Time, with Robert Pattinson, Gets New Trailer and Poster

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Safdie Brothers’ Good Time, with Robert Pattinson, Gets New Trailer and Poster

A24

Safdie Brothers’ Good Time, with Robert Pattinson, Gets New Trailer and Poster

We were among the first to see Josh and Ben Safdie's Good Time when it premiered at this year's Cannes Film Festival. One of our critics on the scene described it as one of the brother filmmakers' harrowing odysseys of the marginalized, and later pegged Robert Pattinson to win the festival's best actor prize (which ended up going to Joaquin Phoenix in You Were Never Really Here). The plot of the film spins out from a bank heist that—as they are prone to do—goes wrong. Pattinson stars as Connie, the heist's mastermind who's hell bent on busting out his mentally handicapped brother, Nick (Ben Safdie), from Elmhurst Hospital Center in Queens. According to our critic: “If this premise sounds like typical genre fare, the Safdies get that and they deliver: Good Time is an action-packed, neon-streaked rush, all elaborate scenarios, racing against time, and police in hot pursuit.”

This Used to Be My Playground Penny Marshall’s A League of Their Own

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This Used to Be My Playground: Penny Marshall’s A League of Their Own
This Used to Be My Playground: Penny Marshall’s A League of Their Own

Light and airy, with only the faintest whiff of pathos or self-importance, A League of Their Own offers a refreshingly buoyant vision of America's favorite pastime. Unburdened by the grandiose mythologizing of movies like The Natural and Field of Dreams, the film regards baseball with a breezy, wide-eyed innocence that captures the uniquely languid joy of the sport.

Working from a screenplay by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel, director Penny Marshall casts the Rockford Peaches—a founding team in the real-life All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL)—as a ragtag ensemble filled with stock comic types, including Rosie O'Donnell as a brassy New Yawk broad and Madonna as an incorrigible floozy. The performances tend toward broad caricature, particularly Tom Hanks's at times gratingly over-the-top turn as the team's perpetually apoplectic manager, Jimmy Dugan. All shouting, spitting, and drunken ass-grabbing, Jimmy is a cartoonish parody of American masculinity that anticipates Hanks's similarly out-sized but more delicately modulated voice work in Toy Story a few years later.

The Films of Sofia Coppola Ranked

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The Films of Sofia Coppola Ranked

Focus Features

The Films of Sofia Coppola Ranked

There's a routine of complaints traditionally leveled at Sofia Coppola. Beyond the faux pas of being born rich, she's been drawn as more of a choreographer of tableaux than a storyteller. Critics have bemoaned her visions of character interiority signaled by dreamy music cues and symmetrical framing over wordy dialogues or dredged-up performances from her stars, who are inevitably blonde and beautiful. Particularly since Lost in Translation's reverse-xenophobia meet-cute, Coppola has alternated between accusations of flaunting her privilege and hosannas for being honest about it.

But if The Virgin Suicides, Marie Antoinette, and (perhaps more debatably) Somewhere girded themselves against these considerations by putting their own haute-bourgeois blinkeredness front and center, the terrain is far murkier in Coppola's The Beguiled. This is a filmmaker obsessed with feminine beauty and ephemeral tragedy of time's passage—so just how boilerplate is her Civil War-era chamber piece supposed to be?

BAMcinemaFest 2017 James N. Kienitz Wilkins’s Common Carrier

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BAMcinemaFest 2017: James N. Kienitz Wilkins’s Common Carrier

Automatic Moving Co.

BAMcinemaFest 2017: James N. Kienitz Wilkins’s Common Carrier

Old-world statues and paintings seem no match for VR headsets in Common Carrier, James N. Kienitz Wilkins’s dizzying experimental essay on what the everyday life of an artist looks like in the 21st century. In much the same way in which the omnipresent radio soundtrack shifts seamlessly between news, hip-hop, and ads, Wilkins’s film skips back and forth between different artists apparently plucked from real life and layers images on top of one another, creating a cannily cacophonous atmosphere which suggests that the true challenge to imagination is maintaining the necessary focus. ISP strikes, custody battles, delivery problems, YouTube tutorials, or just the pervasiveness of screens—it doesn’t matter whether you’re trying to create or just trying to get by, the potential for distraction is limitless.

The Bat, the Cat, and the Penguin Tim Burton’s Batman Returns

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The Bat, the Cat, and the Penguin: Tim Burton’s Batman Returns

Warner Bros.

The Bat, the Cat, and the Penguin: Tim Burton’s Batman Returns

The current draft of film history states that the DayGlo abomination that is Batman & Robin is directly responsible for not just putting Batman on film into an eight-year coma, but poisoning the idea of comic-book film adaptations altogether, to the point where the X-Men movie that followed three years later felt like a cowed, fearful gamble. Time, distance, and no small amount of insider stories have since provided some measure of vindication. Batman & Robin was simply a life-threatening complication stemming from a malignant fear struck into the hearts of Warner Bros. execs by letting a completely unshackled Tim Burton make Batman Returns.

The 10 Best Shark Movies of All Time

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The 10 Best Shark Movies of All Time

Dimension Films

The 10 Best Shark Movies of All Time

Let’s not fool ourselves: There’s only one truly great film with a killer shark at its center. And that’s not likely to change anytime soon, or until we see a film about Katy Perry’s Super Bowl XLIX halftime performance, or one about those mysterious sharks that live inside that active underwater volcano in the Solomon Islands (and that are being investigated by robots!). This week marks the release of 47 Meters Down, the story of two sisters (played by Mandy Moore and Claire Holt) who get into a shark cage off the coast of a Mexican beach and subsequently find themselves having to contemplate if swimming toward a limited-edition vinyl copy of Radiohead’s The Bends is worth it if it means avoiding being eaten alive by a school of sharks. [Editor’s Note: The bends, also known as divers’ disease, is a condition that occurs in scuba divers or at high altitude when dissolved gasses come out of solution in bubbles and can affect any body area, including the heart and brain. Also, Radiohead’s album is pretty great.] Before catching up with the adventures of these two white girls who put way too much trust in two hot Mexican dudes and shark-watcher extraordinaire Matthew Modine, join us in revisiting some of the more impressive appearances in cinematic history. Alexa Camp

Every Pixar Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

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Every Pixar Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures

Every Pixar Movie, Ranked from Worst to Best

Heavy on training montages and intergenerational torch passing, Cars 3 is an old-fashioned sports film at heart. Swap out the talking cars for boxers or baseball pitchers and Pixar’s latest would sit comfortably next to such films as Rocky Balboa and Trouble with the Curve, twilit dramas about a fading athlete struggling with age-old conundrums: how to know when to retire and how to do it with dignity. It’s the sort of counterintuitively mature theme that’s marked Pixar’s best output, but while Cars 3 may be the least objectionable entry in this series to date, it never hits the bittersweet emotional highs of films like Up and Toy Story 3. On the occasion of the film’s release, join us in revisiting the Pixar canon, ranked from worst to best.

Fox Releases “Meeting Nova,” First Clip from War for the Planet of the Apes

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Fox Releases “Meeting Nova,” First Clip from War for the Planet of the Apes

20th Century Fox

Fox Releases “Meeting Nova,” First Clip from War for the Planet of the Apes

Today, 20th Century Fox released the first clip from Matt Reeves’s upcoming War for the Planet of the Apes, the third chapter in their blockbuster franchise that kicked off in 2011 with Rupert Wyatt’s Rise of the Planet of the Apes and continued with Reeves’s Dawn of the Planet of the Apes in 2014. The latest entry centers around Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his band of apes being forced into conflict with an army of humans ruled by Woody Harrelson’s Colonel. According to the film’s official synopsis: “After the apes suffer unimaginable losses, Caesar wrestles with his darker instincts and begins his own mythic quest to avenge his kind. As the journey finally brings them face to face, Caesar and the Colonel are pitted against each other in an epic battle that will determine the fate of both their species and the future of the planet.”

Rollin’ with Kid ‘n Play Class Act at 25

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Rollin’ with Kid ‘n Play: Class Act at 25

Warner Bros.

Rollin’ with Kid ‘n Play: Class Act at 25

Randall Miller’s Class Act is the third film, following 1990’s House Party and 1991’s House Party 2, to star the charismatic rap duo Kid ’n Play, whose unique look, bouncy rhymes, and famous dance moves made them prime candidates for cinematic success. Christopher “Play” Martin has a slippery, lady-killing charm that he easily maximizes with a simple glance at the camera. And his sidekick, Christopher “Kid” Reid, is a limber physical comedian whose impressive, eight-inch-high top fade sits atop a rubbery face tailor-made for the silent comedies of Hal Roach. Critic Jim Emerson called them a “hip-hop Laurel and Hardy,” but their films more often brought to mind a fantasy matchup between a less hyper Jerry Lewis and an even cooler Dean Martin.

Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express, Starring Johnny Depp and Daisy Ridley, Gets First Trailer

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Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express, Starring Johnny Depp and Daisy Ridley, Gets First Trailer

20th Century Fox

Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express, Starring Johnny Depp and Daisy Ridley, Gets First Trailer

Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express is among the English writer’s most acclaimed novels. Published in 1934, it sees master detective Hercule Poirot traveling to London, after a pit stop in Istanbul (by way of Aleppo no less), on the Simplon-Orient Express, where he meets Mr. Samuel Ratchett, a malevolent American who fears for his life. A day later and the train is caught in the snow, and when one of the passengers is discovered murdered, it’s up to Poirot to solve the crime.