The House


Ben Bradlee

1. "Ben Bradlee R.I.P." The legendary Washington Post editor dies at 93.

"President Obama recalled Mr. Bradlee's legacy on Tuesday night in a statement that said: 'For Benjamin Bradlee, journalism was more than a profession—it was a public good vital to our democracy. A true newspaperman, he transformed the Washington Post into one of the country's finest newspapers, and with him at the helm, a growing army of reporters published the Pentagon Papers, exposed Watergate, and told stories that needed to be told—stories that helped us understand our world and one another a little bit better. The standard he set—a standard for honest, objective, meticulous reporting—encouraged so many others to enter the profession. And that standard is why, last year, I was proud to honor Ben with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Today, we offer our thoughts and prayers to Ben's family, and all who were fortunate to share in what truly was a good life.'"

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TAGS: 2001: a space odyssey, amanda hess, ben bradlee, bfi, elvis mitchell, interview magazine, r.i.p., ratatouille, renée zellweger, richard kelly, shia labeouf, slate, the a.v. club, the simpsons, the washington post, william hughes


Oscar de la Renta

1. "Fashion Designer Oscar de la Renta Dead at 82." He dressed some of the most famous women in the world and recently designed Amal Clooney's wedding dress.

"Oscar de la Renta, the legendary Dominican-American fashion designer, has died at age 82, ABC News has confirmed. De la Renta had been battling cancer. His work became the preferred wear for such first ladies as Nancy Reagan, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush, and he designed the dress worn by Amal Alamuddin at her wedding in September to George Clooney. Movie stars such as Jessica Chastain, Penelope Cruz and Kristen Stewart also were great fans of the designer. De la Renta was born in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic to a Dominican mother and a Puerto Rican father. At 18, he moved to Spain to study painting but then switched over to fashion, landing an apprenticeship with Spain's most renowned couturier, Cristobal Balenciaga. "Soon I found that I was more interested in fashion design than I was in continuing as an illustrator,' he once told the Toronto Star. 'I think that any experience you have; anything you pay attention to is part of what I call the 'baggage' you carry with you all your life. My early involvement with painting, even the fact that I come from a tropical country, are part of who and what I am today.'"

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TAGS: andy greenwald, arthur chu, chris ryan, david holzman's diary, David Mackenzie, doctor strange, fury, glenn heath jr., grantland, interview magazine, julianne moore, L.M. Kit Carson, oscar de la renta, r.i.p., sarah paulson, the knick


Misty Upham

1. "Arnaud Desplechin Remembers Misty Upham." A tribute to the actress he directed in Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian.

"The death of Misty Upham is bottomless sorrow. I loved this woman as if she were my younger sister. The press talk about her fragility; I know Misty had that rare gift of being able to offer fragility to the camera, and it gave her a force without limit. Misty had a great soul, and she gave that soul to the film. I don't know why tonight, I think about Marilyn Monroe. Probably because in these two actresses, I see a sense of tragedy and how their wounds turned into gifts—joy, pain, innocence, wildness mixed. Each of them trembling upsets us. And it is hard work that transforms fears and uncertainties into art. I remember our first meeting. I told her about my unreserved admiration for Frozen River. I had been dazzled: Lila was invulnerable as she was almost blind. With glasses, healed, the woman suddenly became very shy. It was her blindness that protected her from the world! When I told her this, Misty jumped on my neck! She could not believe that a European film buff had been able to see what she had done so secretly and subtly."

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TAGS: alan bean plus four, arnaud desplechin, chuck bowen, david lynch, denzel washington, fandor, hannibal, keith uhlich, liam neeson, Misty Upham, nick pinkerton, niles schwartz, paley center for media, the new yorker, tom hanks, twin peaks


Interstellar

1. "Inside Interstellar." For EW, Jeff Jensen's cover story on Christopher Nolan's emotional space odyssey.

"Nolan says he has been changed by Interstellar, but he’s still figuring out how. 'The character of Cooper opened up something for me about the emotional possibilities of a protagonist,' he says, and he relates to Brand, the scientist who believes love is essential even though it defies logic. 'A lot of my job is what you might call scientific,' Nolan says. 'I have always tried to pour myself into the technical side of filmmaking, the things I can control. I relate to the struggle to quantify the elements that are giving you an emotional response. That always feels impossible to me. But I keep trying. A film being more than the sum of its parts is a true mystery.'"

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TAGS: andrew corsello, christopher nolan, dear white people, entertainment weekly, gq, heather langencamp, interstellar, jeff jensen, justin simien, kenneth lonergan, kim morgan, margaret, new nightmare, nicholas spark, richard brody, steven boone, the best of me, udo kier, wes craven


Elizabeth Peña

1. "Elizabeth Peña R.I.P." The Prolific Hispanic Actress Has Passed Away at 55.

"Elizabeth Peña has passed away. The actress, with a professional career spanning nearly 40 years, left us on the night of October 14 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. She had recently wrapped work on the first season of the El Rey Network's action series, Matador, where she played the title character's mother Maritza. Born in Elizabeth, New Jersey and raised by her Cuban immigrant parents, Peña was destined for a career in the arts. Her father, Mario, was a playwright, director, actor, and designer in their native Cuba, who opened up the Latin American Theatre Ensemble after establishing a life for he and his family in New York. As a teen, Peña began making a name for herself as a formidable young actress in the New York theatre scene. She attended, and graduated from, the High School of Performing Arts and began her professional film career in 1978 with León Ichaso's El Super. A few years later, the ambitious Cubana would set off to try her fortunes over on the west coast. That move would prove fruitful, as she would go on to land roles in several major films in the 1980s. By the end of that decade, she had a resumé that included La Bamba, Down and Out in Beverly Hills, *batteries not included, and Blue Steel. She even did something that was almost unheard of for a Latina actress: She had her own primetime ABC series, I Married Dora. She played the title role of Dora in the series, which became infamous and notable because of its controversial premise- which centered on a "green card marriage" that would eventually evolve into something more genuine."

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TAGS: all that jazz, bob fosse, Bob Rafelson, elizabeth peña, film freak central, in the heart of the sea, lena dunham, lumière festival, matt zoller seitz, mountains of the moon, not that kind of girl, pedro almodóvar, ron howard, the criterion collection, walter chaw


Bill Murray

1. "Bill Murray Interview." For Variety, Ramin Setoodeh speaks to the actor about St. Vincent, fame, and the "virus" of Oscar season.

"Even if Murray may have a beer with strangers, he won't be hobnobbing with the press during this year's awards season, despite the Oscar buzz he's generating for St. Vincent. Don't look for him to be joining the other awards-season hopefuls on the campaign trail, either. 'I've never done that,' he says. 'I know that's something Harvey (Weinstein) does—he forces you to do these things. I'm not that way. If you want an award so much, it's like a virus. It's an illness.' When Murray was nominated for Lost in Translation in 2004, he convinced himself he would take home the Academy Award. 'Six months later, I realized I had taken the virus. I had been infected.' He says the careers of some of his peers have faltered because of the golden statue. 'People have this post-Oscar blowback,' he says. 'They start thinking, ‘I can't do a movie unless it's Oscar-worthy.' It just seems people have difficulty making the right choices after that.'"

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TAGS: academy awards, bill murray, chris wisniewski, Damien Chazelle, hip-hop, ismail muhammad, jazz, martin scorsese, ramin setoodeh, reverse shot, richard brody, san francisco bay guardian, shia labeouf, st. vincent, the age of innocence, variety, whiplash


Mark Bell

1. "LFO's Mark Bell: 10 essential tracks." The electronic-music producer, who died last week, was an innovator of electronic sound, from his huge influence on the early club scene to Radiohead remixes and groundbreaking collaborations with Björk.

"Mark Bell was an electronic-music innovator throughout his career, which was tragically cut short last week. Riding the wave of the early-90s dance-music revolution, the Leeds-born Bell and longtime friend and partner Gez Varley defined the northern English 'bleep' techno sound found in LFO's music—especially on the group's bass-heavy self-titled hit. Along the way they helped put Sheffield's Warp Records (home to Aphex Twin, Boards of Canada and countless others) on the map, and remixed Radiohead, Sabres of Paradise and their hip-hop heroes Afrika Baambaataa & Soulsonic Force. When Varley left the group in 1996, Bell maintained a solo career as a respected underground techno producer. In 1997, his transformative work on Björk's epochal Homogenic album brought him into the pop sphere and established a long-running and fruitful partnership. Other collaborations followed, most notably with Depeche Mode, as well as movie soundtracks and more acclaimed productions under the LFO guise. The shock of Bell's death casts a sudden light on a considerable discography, which was marked by adventurism and a consistently recognisable approach to funk-infused, melodic, wonderfully bleepy electronica. His best productions put him in a league with better-known peers like Andrew Weatherall and Aphex Twin. Here are 10 of them."

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TAGS: ben rivers, björk, Damien Chazelle, david byrne, forrest wickman, fritz lang, hangmen also die!, homogenic, iggy pop, j. hoberman, lfo, man hunt, mark bell, new york city, radiohead, slate, terror, u2, whiplash, youtube


Collateral

1. "Collateral." For EW, Darren Franich in praise of Michael Mann's action odyssey, a decade later.

"This could just be a stylish director doing a stylish experiment, like Alfred Hitchcock trying to film Rope in the equivalent of one long take. To me, though, the more accurate comparison is Hitchcock filming Psycho, on the cheap, with his TV crew. It's the perfect merging of style and content. Just as Psycho had to look a little cheap—had to feel like a snuff film directed by a painter—so Collateral needs all those skylines, all those lights in the distance. You're constantly aware that those lights represent real people—and that those real people don't notice the horrors being perpetrated by Vincent."

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TAGS: citizenfour, collateral, darren franich, david fincher, david lynch, edward snowden, entertainment weekly, film comment, gone girl, los angeles, michael mann, michael nordine, nick pinkerton, peter labuza, steven soderbergh, the judge, the knick, wesley morris


Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi

1. "Nobel Peace Prize for Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi." The Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to India's Satyarthi and Pakistan's Yousafzai for their struggles against the suppression of children and for young people's rights, including the right to education.

"Thorbjorn Jagland, chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, said, 'Children must go to school, not be financially exploited.' Yousafzai came to global attention after she was shot in the head by the Taliban—two years ago Thursday—for her efforts to promote education for girls in Pakistan. Since then, after recovering from surgery, she has taken her campaign to the world stage, notably with a speech last year at the United Nations. Through her heroic struggle, she has become a leading spokeswoman for girls' rights to education, said Jagland... Meanwhile, Satyarthi, age 60, has shown great personal courage in heading peaceful demonstrations focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain, the committee said. Satyarthi told reporters that the award was about many more people than him—and that credit should go to all those 'sacrificing their time and their lives for the cause of child rights' and fighting child slavery."

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TAGS: david lynch, Geoffrey Holder, Jan Hooks, Kailash Satyarthi, kevin b. lee, malala yousafzai, nobel prize, pee-wee's big adventure, saturday night live, sight & sound


Patrick Modiano

1. "Patrick Modiano Wins Nobel Prize in Literature." Modiano, the French novelist whose works often explore the traumas of the Nazi occupation of France and hinge on the themes of memory, alienation and the puzzle of identity, won the 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature on Thursday.

"In an announcement in Stockholm, the Swedish Academy cited Mr. Modiano's ability to evoke 'the most ungraspable human destinies' in his work. The Nobel, one of the most prestigious and financially generous awards in the world, comes with a $1.1 million prize. The literature prize is given out for a lifetime of writing rather than for a single work. Mr. Modiano was born in 1945 to a Belgian mother who worked as an actress and a Jewish-Italian father who was often absent during his childhood. Mr. Modiano, who has published around 30 works, including novels, children's books and screenplays, first rose to prominence in 1968 with his novel La Place de l'Étoile. He won the prestigious Prix Goncourt in 1978 for his novel Missing Person. Many of his fictional works are set in Paris and delve into the moral dilemmas that citizens faced under the Nazi occupation. Some play with the detective genre."

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TAGS: aaron aradillas, alessandra stanley, find your beach, got to belong, indiana university, interstellar, larry clark, natas loves you, nobel prize, orson welles, Patrick Modiano, quentin tarantino, Shonda Rhimes, zadie smith






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