The House


Windows 10

1. "Surprise! Microsoft jumps to Windows 10." Forget Windows 9. In an unexpected twist, Microsoft will be going straight to double digits from Windows 8 as it faces a challenging future for its operating system.

"Microsoft just said no to 9. The follow-on to the current Windows 8 operating system will be known as Windows 10. Originally codenamed Windows Threshold, the new operating system essentially does away with the dependency on the tiled 'Metro' user interface that Microsoft had attempted to implement across its entire device line, from desktop PCs to Surface tablets and Windows Phone devices. In its place is a combination of the so-called live tiles, present in areas like the new Start Menu, and a more classic Windows experience that aims to please both touch and keyboard-and-mouse users. Windows 10 is such a substantial leap, according to Microsoft's executive VP of operating systems, Terry Myerson, that the company decided it would be best to skip over Windows 9, the widely expected name for the next version. 'Windows 10 will run on the broadest amount of devices. A tailored experience for each device,' Myerson said at a press event here Tuesday. 'There will be one way to write a universal application, one store, one way for apps to be discovered purchased and updated across all of these devices.'"

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TAGS: Adam Sternbergh, allison slater tate, chris norris, cinema du rock, edward champion, fandor, generation x, laura miller, microsoft, spoilers, the walking dead, the washington post, vulture, windows 10


Jimi: All Is By My Side

1. "What All Is By My Side Gets Wrong About Hendrix." Glenn Kenny on what the film asks us to take in faith.

"Am I doing some musicological nit-picking here? I sure am. But that's because without that, one is likely to come up with an unappealing caricature of Hendrix, and that's what Jimi: All Is By My Side finally amounts to. The movie, which does not credit [Charles] Cross's biography as a source, uses (and changes, or arguably distorts) many of the anecdotes therein, including one in which an enraged Hendrix physically attacks Etchingham with a telephone receiver. In Cross's book, the event is depicted as highly uncharacteristic. While an accomplished traveler in psychedelics, Hendrix simply couldn't handle liquor. 'Any aggression he displayed was usually linked to excessive drinking...his quick temper...seemed in such contrast to his normally polite manner.' Hendrix's traumatic childhood (into which Cross' biography digs deep), combined with the permissive mien of his time and environment, not to mention his vocation, led to not-unpredictable problems with intimacy and personal commitment. But as depicted in Jimi: All Is By My Side, all of these considerations are compressed so as to create a bald and distasteful picture of a Violent Black Man With Woman Problems. In another scene, Etchingham whinges about wanting to go out and have fun while Hendrix, the windows of his apartment papered over to enhance his desired isolation, stares vegetatively at a television. This is supposed to be someone whose command of his instrument extended forwards, backwards, upside-down and sideways over every millimeter of the fretboard and beyond, who is always depicted by friends and colleagues as never not having a guitar within arm's reach."

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TAGS: amy wilentz, camille paglia, charles cross, david cronenberg, glenn kenny, ian mcewan, inherent vice, Jeff Reichert, jimi hendrix, jimi: all is by my side, John Ridley, los angeles review of books, maps to the stars, matt zoller seitz, paul thomas anderson, reverse shot, steven soderbergh, the children act, the knick


The Simpsons Guy

1. "The Simpsons/Family Guy crossover is one of the most fascinatingly weird things to ever happen to television." Whether it was actually good or not is a different matter.

"Was The Simpsons Guy just a craven marketing thing? One of the weirdest things about the episode was how all the rampant self-deprecation felt unnecessary. Make no mistake, this was Family Guy worshipping The Simpsons: a feast of fan service, even if it was mostly fan service for people whose major Simpsons touchstones happened almost 20 years ago. The best stuff in the episode focuses on Stewie and Bart, two characters who don't really have anything to do with each other. Like all his family members, Bart was a recognizable human being in the first 10 years of The Simpsons, a funny and stupid and lovably vain child. Stewie was never an actual child, just like how Brian was never a real dog. (This may explain why, IMHO, the best episodes of Family Guy are the Brian-Stewie episodes.) Which means Stewie can do the kind of things Bart never does—like strike back against eternal bully Nelson Muntz. The one part of the whole crossover that felt next-level genius came during that torture session, when Stewie threw out the first great Simpsons catchphrase in a whole new, freaky context. For once, someone actually meant 'Eat my shorts!' literally."

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TAGS: alessandra stanley, all that jazz, aphex twin, consumed, david cronenberg, david simon, family guy, jonathan lethem, matt zoller seitz, mo ryan, neil genzlinger, the criterion collection, the new york times, the simpsons, the wire


Lost

1. "The Lessons of Lost." Grantland's Andy Greenwald on understanding the most important network show of the past 10 years.

"Lost was more than a TV show. It was a sort of shared madness, a delirium that ranged far beyond Wednesday nights at 10. And, as such, it should have heralded a new golden age for the graying networks. During Lost's reign, cable channels were still focused on the highbrow character dramas that had earned them buckets full of press and prestige—not to mention ratings that threatened to catapult them into the biggest of leagues. (The Walking Dead premiered five months after Lost went dark. Game of Thrones arrived the following April. Together, they would push cable into an entirely different sport.) Then, as now, networks needed to operate on a larger playing field both to differentiate themselves from their more nimble cable competitors and to sustain their far more demanding revenue model. A wholly original multimedia supernova like Lost isn't easily replicated. But what's most disheartening today is to see how little the big four seem inclined to try. After a few years packed with soulless cover versions like The Event and The Nine (more on those below), network executives threw up their hands and moved on: Lost was sui generis."

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TAGS: andy greenwald, barack obama, blackhat, christina saenz-alcántara, eric holder, grantland, inherent vice, jack handey, latino rebels, latinos, lost, michael mann, paul thomas anderson, Phil Hartman, the white house, thomas pynchon


Aphex Twin

1. "Strange Visitor." Pitchfork's Philip Sherburne has a conversation with Aphex Twin.

"To be honest, I had my doubts that an interview would transpire at all—or at least, a traditional sort of interview. Given the surveillance trickery involved in the album's campaign—visitors to a Syro website were shown a virtual profile of their own computer—maybe I'd be speaking into a one-way mirror. Maybe he would interview me. Maybe, if I was really lucky, I'd get to go up in that blimp. But no: As I'm ushered to the rear of the hotel dining room and sit down at a cluttered table, there he is—ponytailed, bearded, looking pretty much exactly as you'd expect—pulling his drum machine out of a duffel bag and rhapsodizing about the benefits of analog sound."

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TAGS: all about eve, aphex twin, atticus ross, b. ruby rich, bim adewunmi, david fincher, gone girl, ignatiy vishnevetsky, mta, npr, peter von bagh, philip sherburne, pitchfork, richard brody, trent reznor, trigger warning


The Graduate

1. "The Movies' 50 Greatest Pop Music Moments." There are few more powerful combinations than when just the right song meets just the right scene. To put all our favorites in one place, The Dissolve compiled 50 remarkable combinations of pop music (broadly defined) and moviemaking.

"[Nathan Rabin on Do the Right Thing and its use of 'Fight the Power' by Public Enemy] Cinematic introductions don't get more dramatic or inspired than Rosie Perez's first scene in Do The Right Thing (which was also her film debut). The film opens with Perez, then best known as a choreographer and dancer, dancing by herself on an empty stage, while images of the Brooklyn neighborhood where the film takes place are projected in the background. And it all plays against the incendiary backdrop of Public Enemy's 'Fight The Power.' Perez's dancing is aggressive and pugilistic; she alternates between skin-tight outfits and boxing attire in a sequence that establishes a tone of feverish intensity before its characters speak a single word. This is what throwing down the gauntlet looks and sounds like."

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TAGS: Al Jean, Ashley Clark, david jesse fox, David Mirkin, do the right thing, fight the power, frank darabont, jacques tati, lauryn hill, Matt Selman, morgan freeman, music, playtime, public enemy, refugee project, reverse shot, rosie perez, taxi driver, the dissolve, the shawshank redemption, the simpsons, tim robbins, vulture


The Simpsons

1. "The 100 Best Simpsons Episodes to Stream." As part of Vulture's Streaming Week, staffers, including Matt Zoller Seitz, have assembled the 100 essential Simpsons episodes.

"Arriving near the end of season two, 'Lisa's Substitute' was one of the best early Simpsons episodes to operate almost entirely in 'sweet' mode (though it has its share of pop-culture references, such as Miss Krabappel trying to seduce Mr. Bergstrom à la Hoffman's breakthrough The Graduate). It's uncharacteristically reserved, and its final sequence—which finds Homer realizing some of his flaws as a dad and reaching out to his daughter to the extent that he can—is genuinely touching. This is also the first Simpsons episode in regular run to compact its opening credits and cut straight to the couch gag (in this case, a repeat of the one from season two's 'Itchy and Scratchy and Marge,' in which the family enters the living room and finds the couch missing)."

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TAGS: alessandra stanley, frances ha, greta gerwig, hou hsiao-hsien, j. hoberman, linda holmes, margaret sullivan, matt zoller seitz, new york film festival, sarah polley, Shonda Rhimes, the new york times, the simpsons, vulture


Fran Lebowitz

1. "Fran Lebowitz to Tourists: 'Stay Home.'" The accalimed author and public speaker on tourists, Bloomberg, hotels, Brooklyn, and more.

"Tourism as a number-one industry is a terrible, terrible idea for any city, especially New York. If you were going to turn a city, which is a place where people live, into a tourist attraction, you're going to have to make it a place that people who don't live here, like. So I object to living in a place for people who don't live here. As it became more and more intense, it became more and more a place where the actual citizens are pushed out to the edges. A friend of mine always says this: 'I don't care what kind of aesthetic people have; the second they have a kid, their house becomes hor-rible.' The second you have a kid, whether you think it's going to or not, your house becomes full of plastic junk. So this is the same with tourists. The city will sink to that level of having a house of three- year-old children, so they like certain things, they don't like certain things. And they like things that you don't like, or that I don't like. I do object to it. And I would like to see fewer and fewer tourists and I'm tired of hearing about how much money they bring to the city because the kind of jobs the tourists bring to the city are the worst jobs. They're hotel maid jobs, they're jobs that have no future to them."

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TAGS: child marriage, diana ross, emma watson, feminism, fran lebowitz, mahogany, michael a. gonzales, norman mclaren, Polly Bergen, united nations


Scotland

1. "Scottish independence: Scotland votes No." Alex Salmond's dream of independence has been shattered after Scotland voted to stay part of the United Kingdom.

"Scotland today rejected independence and voted to remain part of the United Kingdom at the end of the most intense political campaign the country has ever seen. The silent majority finally raised its voice on a tense yet utterly compelling night of political history. During a referendum that attracted record numbers of voters and was hailed as a triumph of democracy, the people voted to maintain the 307-year Union. A decisive No vote was the culmination of two and a half-years of vigorous and at times edgy campaigning, which looks certain to change the constitutional map of Britain for ever. As the votes were counted, a grim-faced Alex Salmond was seen boarding a private jet at Aberdeen airport just after 3am. Photographed with his wife Moira, the First Minister was contemplating his political future after the referendum he had strived for throughout his life delivered a telling blow against him."

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TAGS: alex salmond, azadeh jafari, belle and sebastian, football, iran, j.c. chandor, joe berlinger, michael moore, nick pinkerton, north dallas forty, reverse shot, sarah larson, scotland, stuart murdoch, the longest yard, the new yorker, united kingdom, vahid mortazavi


Charles Chaplin

1. "The Brave Open Letter Graham Greene Wrote Defending Charlie Chaplin from McCarthy." To mark its 100th anniversary, The New Republic is republishing a collection of its most memorable articles. This piece, an open letter from Greene in defense of his friend against McCarthy and his cronies, was published on October 13, 1952.

"I can't figure out why other people like it. I know why I like it. I know the things that were interesting that kept coming up in conversations. And then also, to work on a script with the person who wrote the novel, that can be a gift. There can also be a lot of frustration. Or certainly it can be perceived that way. Will this person be able to see the forest for the trees? Or will they be so wed to how difficult it was to make this storyline work that they're not willing to jettison certain elements when it doesn't? I know that's a commonly-held philosophy about novelists. But with Gillian, it couldn't be further from the truth. She has—and David Koepp has it too—that love of where the audience is in the narrative. She was very good at taking things that were 13 chapters into the book and saying, well that could be in the introduction. She picked out the traits that needed to be dramatised, but didn't necessarily put them in the same chronological order."

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TAGS: adrian peterson, charles chaplin, cold sweat: my father james brown and me, graham greene, james brown, john green, joseph mccarthy, nathan rabin, rian johnson, robin gaby fisher, terry gilliam, the fault in our stars, todd vanderwerff, transparent, yamma brown






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