The House


Braving Ebola

1. "Braving Ebola." Portraits of those who labor and those who survived at an Ebola treatment center in rural Liberia.

"The patients arrive, at first fearful of the people in spacesuits whose faces they cannot see. They wait for test results, for the next medical rounds, for symptoms to appear or retreat. They watch for who recovers to sit in the courtyard shade and who does not. They pray. The workers offer medicine, meals, cookies and comfort. They try to make patients smile. Very, very carefully, they start IVs. They spray chlorine, over and over, and they dig graves. They pray. These are the people of one Ebola clinic in rural Liberia. Run by the American charity International Medical Corps, the clinic rose in September out of a tropical forest. It now employs more than 170 workers, a mix of locals and foreigners, some of them volunteers. There are laborers trying to make money for their families, university students helping because Ebola has shut down their schools, and American doctors who, after years of studying outbreaks, are seeing Ebola's ravages in person for the first time. A mobile laboratory operated by the United States Navy has set up shop at a shuttered university. Now, test results come back in a matter of hours instead of several days. Some of the workers will stay a few more weeks, or until the end of the year. Many of the Liberians vow to remain until the disease is gone, when they can go back to their old jobs or resume their former lives. They work toward a time after Ebola."

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TAGS: academy awards, christopher nolan, crash, ebola, flying lotus, foster hirsch, grantland, interstellar, James Bell, katie rife, liberia, mark harris, method acting, ready err not, sight & sound, stephanie zacharek, the a.v. club, the village voice, vhs


Tim Cook

1. "Tim Cook Speaks Up." Apple's chief executive says he is "proud to be gay."

"While I have never denied my sexuality, I haven't publicly acknowledged it either, until now. So let me be clear: I'm proud to be gay, and I consider being gay among the greatest gifts God has given me. Being gay has given me a deeper understanding of what it means to be in the minority and provided a window into the challenges that people in other minority groups deal with every day. It's made me more empathetic, which has led to a richer life. It's been tough and uncomfortable at times, but it has given me the confidence to be myself, to follow my own path, and to rise above adversity and bigotry. It's also given me the skin of a rhinoceros, which comes in handy when you're the CEO of Apple. The world has changed so much since I was a kid. America is moving toward marriage equality, and the public figures who have bravely come out have helped change perceptions and made our culture more tolerant. Still, there are laws on the books in a majority of states that allow employers to fire people based solely on their sexual orientation. There are many places where landlords can evict tenants for being gay, or where we can be barred from visiting sick partners and sharing in their legacies. Countless people, particularly kids, face fear and abuse every day because of their sexual orientation."

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TAGS: alejandro gonzález iñárritu, angelo muredda, apple, birdman, catcall, chuck bowen, cinema scope, fandor, film comment, grady hendrix, hanna rosin, kaiju, nick cave & the bad seeds, pj harvey, red right hand, slate, tim cook


The Other Side of the Wind

1. "Hollywood Ending Near for Orson Welles's Last Film." The New York Times reports that cinema buffs are one step closer to seeing The Other Side of the Wind.

"For more than four decades, Hollywood insiders, financiers and dreamers have been obsessed by the quest to recover The Other Side of the Wind, the unfinished last film of Orson Welles. Cinema buffs consider it the most famous movie never released, an epic work by one of the great filmmakers. Endless legal battles among the rights holders, including Welles's daughter, kept the 1,083 reels of negatives inside a warehouse in a gritty suburb of Paris despite numerous efforts to complete the film—a movie within a movie about the comeback attempt of an aging, maverick director played by John Huston. The quest may be over. A Los Angeles production company, Royal Road Entertainment, said on Tuesday that it had reached an agreement with the sometimes-warring parties to buy the rights. The producers say they aim to have it ready for a screening in time for May 6, the 100th anniversary of Welles's birth, and to promote its distribution at the American Film Market in Santa Monica, Calif., next month."

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TAGS: adrian chen, catcall, christopher nolan, David Lowery, eric schmidt, force majeure, gamergate, google, interstellar, julian assange, new york city, orson welles, Ruben Östlund, the new york times, the other side of the wind, tom shone


Frank Serpico

1. "The Police Are Still Out of Control." And Frank Serpico should know.

"Today the combination of an excess of deadly force and near-total lack of accountability is more dangerous than ever: Most cops today can pull out their weapons and fire without fear that anything will happen to them, even if they shoot someone wrongfully. All a police officer has to say is that he believes his life was in danger, and he's typically absolved. What do you think that does to their psychology as they patrol the streets—this sense of invulnerability? The famous old saying still applies: Power corrupts, and absolute power corrupts absolutely. (And we still don't know how many of these incidents occur each year; even though Congress enacted the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act 20 years ago, requiring the Justice Department to produce an annual report on 'the use of excessive force by law enforcement officers,' the reports were never issued.)"

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TAGS: a girl walks home alone at night, ana lily amirpour, barack obama, flavorpill, frank serpico, Harry Shearer, jacques tati, james quandt, nypd, reverse shot, richard nixon, the simpsons


Affordable Care Act

1. "Is the Affordable Care Act Working?" After a year fully in place, the Affordable Care Act has largely succeeded in delivering on President Obama’s main promises, an analysis by a team of reporters and data researchers shows. But it has also fallen short in some ways and given rise to a powerful conservative backlash.

"At its most basic level, the Affordable Care Act was intended to reduce the number of Americans without health insurance. Measured against that goal, it has made considerable progress. A perfect measurement of the numbers of people affected by the law is still difficult, but a series of private sector surveys and a government report reach the same basic estimates: The number of Americans without health insurance has been reduced by about 25 percent this year—or eight million to 11 million people. Of that total, it appears that more than half of people who are newly insured signed up for Medicaid, especially in the states that opted to broaden eligibility for the program to low-income residents. Most of the rest enrolled in private health plans through the new state insurance marketplaces."

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TAGS: 35mm, adrian chen, affordable care act, birdman, citizenfour, dear white people, facebook, i won't let you down, new beverly cinema, nick pinkerton, ok go, richard brody, wesley morris, wired


Mulholland Drive

1. "Why David Lynch's Mulholland Drive Is a Great Horror Film." For the Vulture, Bilge Ebiri explains why.

"This is about as perfect a 'horror' scene as one can imagine. The oddly floating camera, the strangely somnambulant delivery of the actors, the way they seem to be literally pulled towards the dumpster, the anticipation of the reveal. And, yes, the sound—that ever-present, Lynchian thrum that infects even the most mundane things with anticipation and dread. The scene also sets up this terrifying thing behind the dumpster—is it a hobo, a demon, or something else?—as being a pivotal figure, even though we only see him briefly a couple more times later in the film. ('He’s the one who’s doing it' is such a delectably vague statement.) So, right at the outset of Mulholland Drive, we have the suggestion of the supernatural and demonic, of something fantastical lurking beneath what seems, at least, at that point, to be a somewhat straightforward thriller."

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TAGS: bilge ebiri, blackwater, carrie, david lynch, ikea, jeremy scahill, kenneth lonergan, kieran culkin, mulholland drive, oscar de la renta, piper laurie, sarah jessica parker, the intercept, the shining, this is our youth, vulture


Keanu Reeves

1. "Keanu Reeves on Not Receiving More Offers from Hollywood: 'It Sucks.'" Keanu Reeves continues to star in fun new action movies. But he still wishes there were more offers on the table.

"No, it sucks, but it's just the way it is. You can have positive and negative experiences, but what I like about studios are the resources and the worlds that they can create. Obviously, a lot of good filmmakers work on studio movies. Even when I was working on studio movies more often, I was always doing independent movies. So for me, that was just not happening, but I want to keep going, making things, and telling stories. I want to be able to do that—to be an actor, a director, to produce, you know? If we're going to do a delineation between studio and independent [films], I was always hoping to do both."

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TAGS: brad pitt, Douchebag, eric hynes, how to get away with murder, issy stapleton, john wick, keanu reeves, kelli stapleton, mark harris, medium, michael mark cohen, new york film festival, reverse shot, scandal, Shonda Rhimes, the sopranos, toronto international film festival, zach galifianakis


Ben Bradlee

1. "Ben Bradlee R.I.P." The legendary Washington Post editor dies at 93.

"President Obama recalled Mr. Bradlee's legacy on Tuesday night in a statement that said: 'For Benjamin Bradlee, journalism was more than a profession—it was a public good vital to our democracy. A true newspaperman, he transformed the Washington Post into one of the country's finest newspapers, and with him at the helm, a growing army of reporters published the Pentagon Papers, exposed Watergate, and told stories that needed to be told—stories that helped us understand our world and one another a little bit better. The standard he set—a standard for honest, objective, meticulous reporting—encouraged so many others to enter the profession. And that standard is why, last year, I was proud to honor Ben with the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Today, we offer our thoughts and prayers to Ben's family, and all who were fortunate to share in what truly was a good life.'"

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TAGS: 2001: a space odyssey, amanda hess, ben bradlee, bfi, elvis mitchell, interview magazine, r.i.p., ratatouille, renée zellweger, richard kelly, shia labeouf, slate, the a.v. club, the simpsons, the washington post, william hughes


Oscar de la Renta

1. "Fashion Designer Oscar de la Renta Dead at 82." He dressed some of the most famous women in the world and recently designed Amal Clooney's wedding dress.

"Oscar de la Renta, the legendary Dominican-American fashion designer, has died at age 82, ABC News has confirmed. De la Renta had been battling cancer. His work became the preferred wear for such first ladies as Nancy Reagan, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush, and he designed the dress worn by Amal Alamuddin at her wedding in September to George Clooney. Movie stars such as Jessica Chastain, Penelope Cruz and Kristen Stewart also were great fans of the designer. De la Renta was born in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic to a Dominican mother and a Puerto Rican father. At 18, he moved to Spain to study painting but then switched over to fashion, landing an apprenticeship with Spain's most renowned couturier, Cristobal Balenciaga. "Soon I found that I was more interested in fashion design than I was in continuing as an illustrator,' he once told the Toronto Star. 'I think that any experience you have; anything you pay attention to is part of what I call the 'baggage' you carry with you all your life. My early involvement with painting, even the fact that I come from a tropical country, are part of who and what I am today.'"

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TAGS: andy greenwald, arthur chu, chris ryan, david holzman's diary, David Mackenzie, doctor strange, fury, glenn heath jr., grantland, interview magazine, julianne moore, L.M. Kit Carson, oscar de la renta, r.i.p., sarah paulson, the knick


Misty Upham

1. "Arnaud Desplechin Remembers Misty Upham." A tribute to the actress he directed in Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian.

"The death of Misty Upham is bottomless sorrow. I loved this woman as if she were my younger sister. The press talk about her fragility; I know Misty had that rare gift of being able to offer fragility to the camera, and it gave her a force without limit. Misty had a great soul, and she gave that soul to the film. I don't know why tonight, I think about Marilyn Monroe. Probably because in these two actresses, I see a sense of tragedy and how their wounds turned into gifts—joy, pain, innocence, wildness mixed. Each of them trembling upsets us. And it is hard work that transforms fears and uncertainties into art. I remember our first meeting. I told her about my unreserved admiration for Frozen River. I had been dazzled: Lila was invulnerable as she was almost blind. With glasses, healed, the woman suddenly became very shy. It was her blindness that protected her from the world! When I told her this, Misty jumped on my neck! She could not believe that a European film buff had been able to see what she had done so secretly and subtly."

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TAGS: alan bean plus four, arnaud desplechin, chuck bowen, david lynch, denzel washington, fandor, hannibal, keith uhlich, liam neeson, Misty Upham, nick pinkerton, niles schwartz, paley center for media, the new yorker, tom hanks, twin peaks






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