The House


David Lynch

1. "David Lynch, Who Began as a Visual Artist, Gets a Museum Show." Hilarie M. Sheets, for the New York Times, on "David Lynch: The Unified Field" ahead of its September 13 opening at the Pennsylvania Academy.

"Despite the cultlike devotion to Mr. Lynch's films, 'nobody's paid attention to him in terms of my colleagues at American museums,' observed Robert Cozzolino, the senior curator of the Pennsylvania Academy, who organized the show. It brings together paintings and drawings from five decades and includes a trove of barely exhibited early work from Mr. Lynch's time in Philadelphia that set the tone for everything that followed. 'I think the art world has been suspicious of David, although he was trained as an artist,' said Brett Littman, executive director of the Drawing Center in New York, referring to the fashion of creative people prominent in one arena trying their hand in another. 'He's not James Franco.' Mr. Littman organized a smaller show of Mr. Lynch's works on paper and photographs last year in Los Angeles at Kayne Griffin Corcoran, which represents the artist."

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TAGS: anthony gonzalez, bright lights film journal, david lynch, david lynch: the unified field, ferguson, george lucas, hilarie m. sheets, jon stewart, joseph mcbride, m83, nicolas fromageau, orson welles, pennsylvania academy, rosewater, star wars, the new york times, too much johnson


The Cosmopolitans

1. "Whit Stillman's The Cosmopolitans." Richard Broday reviews the filmmaker's Amazon pilot.

"There are no Fitzgeralds or Hemingways, no Steins or Pounds, in Stillman's still-young set of expatriates. (Or, rather, there is one Hemingway—Dree, Ernest's great-granddaughter, who plays one of the American expats.) If there's artistic ambition and aesthetic adventure at work among the group that he gathers, it isn't yet evident; there are no late-night discussions of lofty creative ideals. Rather, there's love and real estate—and a constant jockeying for a nose ahead in the competition for esteem (or 'reputation'). Cafés there are: the series has a long café scene up front, in which two American men, Jimmy (Adam Brody) and Hal (Jordan Rountree), talk with Sandro (Adriano Giannini), an Italian cynic of a certain age, who offers the young men aphoristically critical life advice and gives them a display of knowing worldliness that sparks both action and confusion—and that lures a young woman from the next table."

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TAGS: angelina jolie, brad pitt, david chase, david fincher, gap, my so-called life, richard brody, Richard Lawson, the cosmopolitans, the simpsons, the sopranos, whit stillman


Gaza

1. "Israel, Hamas Cease-Fire Holds" Calm settled over the Gaza Strip and Israel on Wednesday as sides weigh gains.

"An open-ended cease-fire between Israel and Palestinian militants in the Gaza Strip was holding Wednesday, as many people on both sides of the conflict wondered what was gained during 50 days of fighting. The Gaza war—the 3rd round of fighting since the Islamic militant group Hamas seized power in 2007—left more than 2,200 people dead, caused widespread destruction in the densely populated coastal territory, and paralyzed large parts of southern Israel during much of the summer. After more than seven weeks of fighting, the two sides settled for an ambiguous interim agreement in exchange for a period of calm. Hamas, though badly battered, remains in control of Gaza with part of its military arsenal intact. Israel and Egypt will maintain a blockade tightened seven years ago, despite Hamas' long-running demand that the border restrictions be lifted. Early Wednesday the Israeli military said there were no reports of violations since the cease-fire went into effect at 7 p.m. (1600 GMT) Tuesday. Hamas declared victory, even though it had little to show for a war that killed 2,143 Palestinians, wounded more than 11,000 and left some 100,000 homeless. On the Israeli side, 64 soldiers and six civilians were killed, including two by Palestinian mortar fire shortly before the cease-fire was announced."

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TAGS: alejandro gonzález iñárritu, anita elberse, birdman, david lynch, ferguson, gaza, hamas, harvard university, ice bucket challenge, israel, michael brown, Michael Keaton, palestine, peter debruge, symbiopsychotaxiplasm: take one, venice film festival, william greaves


Emmys 2014

1. "2014 Emmy Winners." Breaking Bad, Modern Family Earn Top Emmy Awards in Night of Repeats and Upsets.

"In a night marked by a few upsets and a host of repeat winners, Breaking Bad grabbed its second consecutive Emmy for best drama series while Modern Family made it a record-tying fifth consecutive win for comedy series. The surprise wins at the 66th annual Primetime Emmy Awards came not from buzzed-about newbies such as Netflix's Orange Is the New Black or HBO's True Detective but lower-profile contenders including Sherlock: His Last Vow. HBO's The Normal Heart and FX's Fargo prevailed as expected for movie and miniseries, respectively, but the PBS drama Sherlock wound up leading the Emmy field overall with a total of seven wins—a result that no Emmy prognosticator managed to forecast. CBS' The Good Wife got its moment in the sun with Julianna Margulies taking her second win for lead drama actress. Julia Louis-Dreyfus scored her third straight win as lead comedy actress for HBO's Veep. And Allison Janney became a rare double winner in snaring supporting comedy actress for CBS' Mom—a week after landing guest actress in a drama for her turn on Showtime's Masters of Sex."

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TAGS: adrian martin, alfred hitchcock, breaking bad, david fincher, emmy awards, gone girl, jason bailey, kim's video & music, lgbtq, love is strange, Menahem Golan, modern family, mpaa, nick pinkerton, notorious, sherlock, the apple


Richard Attenborough

1. "Richard Attenborough R.I.P." The acclaimed actor-director dies at 90.

"Acclaimed actor and Oscar-winning director Richard Attenborough, whose film career on both sides of the camera spanned 60 years, has died. He was 90. The actor's son, Michael Attenborough told the BBC that his father died Sunday. He had been in poor health for some time. Prime Minister David Cameron issued a statement calling Attenborough 'one of the greats of cinema.' 'His acting in Brighton Rock was brilliant, his directing of Gandhi was stunning,' Cameron said. Ben Kingsley, who shot to global fame for his performance as Mahatma Gandhi, recalled Attenborough's passionate 20 year struggle to bring Gandhi's story to the big screen. The film won eight Oscars, including best picture, best director for Attenborough and best actor for Kingsley. 'He placed in me an absolute trust and in turn I placed an absolute trust in him and grew to love him,' said Kingsley. 'I along with millions of others whom he touched through his life and work will miss him dearly.'"

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TAGS: alex pappademas, david thomson, frank miller, gawker, miley cyrus, mtv video music awards, rich juzwiak, richard attenborough, Sam Smith, sin city, white bird in a blizzard, wrecking ball


Inherent Vice

1. "Kent Jones talks Inherent Vice, Godard, Resnais, Kristen Stewart, and more from NYFF52." Brian Brooks speaks with the festival's director and selection committee chair.

"Wild movie. You know, it's the first [Thomas] Pynchon film adaptation, and it really catches his tone. It really catches the antic nature of him: the crazy names of characters, the nutty behavior, and then also the emotional undertone. It has the flavor of Pynchon. It has this Big Lebowski element to one side of it, but the emotional undertone, the desperation, the paranoia, and the yearning in the film...[Paul Thomas Anderson's] an absolutely amazing filmmaker and it's incredible to see him responding to someone else's creation and then building his own creation out of it. He sort of did that with There Will Be Blood, but not really. It's his own movie, inspired by the novel Oil! I was born in 1960, but I certainly remember 1971 very well and I gotta say, from the minute the movie started to the minute it ended, I was back—way back—to the point where I was thinking 'Gee, my son was born in the '90s.' So it's a different kind of relationship that he would have. It's an amazing piece of work, and at this point Joaquin Phoenix and Paul have something so rare between them as an actor and director, and Sam Waterston's daughter, Katherine, is in it, and she's riveting every minute she's on screen. It's quite a film."

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TAGS: aaron paul, academy awards, bryan cranston, emmy awards, eric hynes, film society of lincoln center, inherent vice, julia louis-dreyfus, kent jones, kirk douglas, kyle buchanan, lauren bacall, mad men, matthew weiner, new york film festival, paul thomas anderson, telluride film festival, toronto international film festival


Leonard Maltin

1. "Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide Ending After 45 Years." And Pete Hammond, for Deadline, says the Internet is to blame.

"Another print icon bites the dust. Leonard Maltin's 2015 Movie Guide will be the final edition of this film lovers' guide which started in 1969 under the title TV MOVIES. But in recent years the annual guide, which now numbers 1,611 pages and features nearly 16,000 capsule movie reviews, has become a victim of the changing times and the way information is consumed by a new generation. The new edition, which comes out on September 2nd is the last and that will be bad news for many industry-ites and film lovers who used it religiously. 'An entire generation has been raised to acquire all their information online from their mobile devices or computers. These are not the likely customers for a physical paperback reference book. Our sales have sharply declined in recent years,' Maltin told me this morning. The virtual death of bookstores likely didn't help the cause either. 'We still have a loyal readership. It's just smaller than it used to be. There are an awful lot of people who have been loyal to the book and are used to having it on their night stand or their coffee table for years and years and years. Some bought it sporadically and some bought it every year and god bless them,' he added."

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TAGS: duel at diablo, ferguson, flavorwire, j. hoberman, jason bailey, leonard maltin, matías piñeiro, matt zoller seitz, movie guide, nick pinkerton, paris blues, sex lies and videotape, Sidney Poitier, step up: all in, the princess of france, white people


Ferguson

1. "The Coming Race War Won't Be About Race." Ferguson is not just about systemic racism—it's about class warfare and how America's poor are held back, says Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

"Dystopian books and movies like Snowpiercer, The Giver, Divergent, Hunger Games, and Elysium have been the rage for the past few years. Not just because they express teen frustration at authority figures. That would explain some of the popularity among younger audiences, but not among twentysomethings and even older adults. The real reason we flock to see Donald Sutherland's porcelain portrayal in Hunger Games of a cold, ruthless president of the U.S. dedicated to preserving the rich while grinding his heel into the necks of the poor is that it rings true in a society in which the One Percent gets richer while our middle class is collapsing."

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TAGS: charles p. pierce, elijah wood, ferguson, flashdance, kareem abdul-jabbar, nacho vigalondo, open windows, pitchfork, rolling stone


Let's Be Cops

1. "Let's Be Real." Wesley Morris on Let's Be Cops, cop movies, and the shooting in Ferguson.

"This would just be more flushable summer waste (and, please, don't let me stop you from jiggling the handle), except Let's Be Cops somehow doubles as a fantasy that knows its social limits, limits that connect it to the turmoil in Ferguson, and those limits ease on down the road of race. The movie doesn't want to make a big deal about this, but Justin is black and Ryan white, which is newsworthy in that, despite one guy's annoyance with the other, they appear to have been friends long enough for racial osmosis to set it. Justin speaks the way black comedians—like Wayans's father, Damon Sr.—do when they're impersonating an uptight white guy. Ryan occasionally twists and spikes the cadences of his speech so it sounds comedically black. Justin says 'dude' a lot. Ryan likes 'bro.' Permeable racial identity becomes a kind of running gag, especially once Key and his impersonation of a loopy Mexican gangsta shows up."

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TAGS: communism, consumed, david cronenberg, Diego Luna, doom, emmy awards, ferguson, film international, gael garcía bernal, let's be cops, Madlib, madvillainy, orange is the new black, red hollywood, richard brody, shane joaquin jimenez, sherlock, the criterion collection, true detective, wesley morris, y tu mamá también


James Baldwin

1. "Jess Row: Native Sons." A straight white American man on loving James Baldwin and learning to write about race.

"When Another Country was published—at the very peak of Baldwin's public stature as a civil rights activist—it was taken as a document of a very small slice of the present: the Greenwich Village and Paris of the late 1950s and early 1960s, where interracial couples and gay people were able to live openly, mostly but not entirely out of the omnipresent shadow of violence. But Another Country is also an intensely prophetic book, in which Baldwin glimpses a world much more like the one we inhabit today, where overt, legal racism and homophobia is inexorably falling away, and what we have to look at, instead, is the face of the person we've feared and misunderstood and avoided. It's a plural world, a world of unstable pronouns, multiple identities, and overlapping narratives. Which is not to say that anyone in the book ends up happy: this is a novel, after all, that begins with one man's leap off the George Washington Bridge and ends with a series of betrayals—profound and petty—among his survivors. It's out of that traumatized state, Baldwin seems to say, that the most important realization occurs: our offenses, our intertwined histories and mutual obligations, are more like love affairs than legal cases—love affairs that are never really over. 'It doesn't do any good to blame the people or the time,' one of his characters says, 'one is oneself all those people. We are the time.'"

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TAGS: another country, biophilia, björk, björk: biophilia live, garden state, guardians of the galaxy, james baldwin, jess row, jezebel, jonathan beller, lindy west, lucy, mike leigh, nick pinkerton, queens, tim grierson, Zach Braff






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