EH: Complacency might just be the cardinal sin in Fincher's universe, and The Game is particularly scathing on this point. I noted earlier that all of these films are in some way about class consciousness, and this is particularly true here. Nicholas (Michael Douglas) is a very successful businessman, and yet it hasn't brought him happiness. He is completely alone, rattling around his large mansion in isolation (a sensation that would return in Panic Room, suggesting that another of Fincher's pet sins is owning too much space for oneself). As usual with Fincher, the film's aesthetics suggest the themes boiling just below the surface; he inscribes class issues directly into the texture and composition of his images.

The homeless, the poor, the unfortunate and menial workers show up continually at the edges of the narrative, never as its focus: garbagemen emptying cans in a corner of the frame while the wealthy protagonist fills the foreground; homeless beggars outside Nicholas' office, mostly obscured from view even though we hear their begging on the soundtrack; the desperate guy in the bathroom stall (represented only by his protruding hand) who asks Nicholas to hand him some toilet paper. When Nicholas goes to lunch with his brother Conrad (Sean Penn) at the beginning of the film, the waitress (later revealed to be Deborah Unger's Christine) is only seen from the waist down, hovering over their table, her voice wafting downward from outside the frame. Nicholas doesn't quite see her, even when her presence is very intrusive, and the film subtly mirrors his point of view. He is oblivious to those below his class: he doesn't care about and won't help anyone else, almost as a matter of principle. Would it have been so difficult for him to hand that guy a roll of toilet paper? It's like he has a warped moral code that forbids doing anything for others. The film is about awakening Nicholas to the lives of other people. It's only when he is at his lowest point that he begins to care: once he himself is broke, he thinks of his employees' payroll and pensions for the first time.

 

David Fincher

JB: Very true. And how is Nicholas made to care? He has his white-collar daintiness beat out of him. The Game is rife with imagery that suggests that salvation is found by crawling through the muck, by getting dirty. Nicholas begins the film a sharp-dressed man in a fine suit with a shower conveniently located in his office. Then he has wine spilled on him in a restaurant. And he's forced to climb up an elevator shaft and then jump into a garbage bin. And he takes a cab ride that deposits him in the San Francisco Bay. And in the film's most surreal moment, Nicholas wakes up in a grave in Mexico. Even at the very end, he's covered in glass. As Fight Club does even more overtly, The Game suggests that you're not really living unless you're shedding the social niceties of the world and reveling in life's primal shadows. With that established, if we follow the through-line of Fincher's films back to Se7en, perhaps the director doesn't sympathize with Somerset so much after all. It's Mills who gets dirty, bloody and wet. In Fincher's world, if you don't have a cut on your face, you're faceless.

EH: Good points, but I think this emphasis on the viscera of these films does a disservice to their greater implications. Yes, Fincher's characters are put through some pretty intense and violent initiations, and there is a sense in which these films are about “shedding the social niceties of the world” (a great phrase for both The Game and Fight Club). From another angle, though, there's a greater meaning to Fincher's penchant for putting his characters through the ringer. Maybe this is just another way of framing our earlier points about substance vs. style. But Nicholas isn't merely covered in filth or violently assaulted; he's shown the way that other people live their lives. In getting back to a more primal form of existence, he's also coming into contact with the previously ignored working class: quite literally, since his fate is tied to a former waitress, but also figuratively, in that his money and privilege are stripped away from him. The bizarre sojourn to Mexico you mention is especially potent in this regard. He's reminded, quite forcefully, of what it might be like to have no money, no resources, no way out. His watch, the last remnant of his former life, ultimately rescues him from this predicament, but not before he has a desperate period of floundering during which, to all appearances, he looks just like any other homeless beggar on the streets. In other words, the film isn't only about physical violence and getting one's hands dirty, it's about the existential states underlying these material circumstances: wealth, poverty, influence, leisure.

JB: I don't disagree in the least, insofar as The Game is concerned. The brief segment in Mexico makes for the most captivating portion of the film (and I don't think it's a coincidence that it's the chapter furthest removed from the elements of the screenplay's gimmick—the titular game). I can't think of another film in which Douglas reveals the vulnerability he has in these scenes. There's that shot of him sitting on the bench looking utterly undone, with a fly landing on his shoulder like he's just another piece of trash in the gutter. His absolute lowest point comes just a little bit later, before he has to turn over his watch, when he's asked why he didn't go to the Mexican police: “I don't speak Spanish,” he says. Those words are the insult to his injury. Without material extravagance to prove that he's a somebody, Nicholas becomes a nobody. He gets put on the wrong side of the negotiating table, and he looks so pathetically small. When he says he can't speak Spanish, he might as well be admitting: “I'm inadequate.” And in that moment The Game beautifully hints at what Fight Club will say directly: material wealth is empty.

EH: These two films are very closely related, for sure. Both The Game and Fight Club are about men who are driven out of thoroughly modern, consumerist lifestyles (albeit unhappy ones) by violent, frightening outside forces. In both cases, these forces are portrayed very ambiguously: they are malign, dangerous and destructive, and yet also life-affirming in curious ways. Certainly Nicholas, and arguably Edward Norton's “Jack” as well, wind up “better people” because of what happens to them, even if they don't realize it while it's actually happening. They leave behind their empty corporate lives, embrace a life of freedom outside of the normal societal system and, in a nod to commercial movie necessity, even make romantic connections. These are, in spite of everything, and in spite of the profound moral ambiguity of Fight Club's resolution in particular, relatively optimistic endings. I said before that I think Fincher is a pessimist but not the nihilist he's often accused of being, but now I'm starting to wonder if even this is entirely true. His vision of the world in these two films is still dark, still focused on the evil and corruption that John Doe sees in things, but Fincher offers Nicholas and Jack a way out, a path to redemption, that is not available to any of the characters in Se7en. In Se7en, the message is much darker: there is no redemption, no reversal or recovery to be found in John's crimes against the status quo, no possibility of escape.

The assaults on the status quo in the two later films are portrayed as equally inevitable, equally unavoidable, but ultimately less malevolent. If John Doe's murders are the extinguishing flames of an angry God wiping Sodom and Gomorrah off the map, The Game and Fight Club offer up a purifying fire, a blaze that seems destructive on its surface but actually only burns away the accumulated grime and burdens of a miserable life. Many of Fincher's films are about personal transformations (or, as in Panic Room, the stubborn lack thereof) triggered by extreme reversals of fortune. These transformative forces are often signaled by Fincher through the use of self-conscious references to film or video media. In The Game, these media are used metaphorically in two distinct ways. The first is the metaphor of film as memory, the use of digital techniques to make Nicholas' childhood memories appear to be “vintage” home movies—washed-out, scratched and stippled—though it becomes increasingly apparent that they are not meant to be actual films. This is just a representation of the way Nicholas sees his past, perhaps because Fincher sees film and memory as somewhat interchangeable. Benjamin Button uses a similar device, both in the clockmaker's tale and in the brief flashbacks of the man who is hit by lightning seven times.

The other way in which The Game uses film/video manipulation points the way directly forward to Fight Club. Nicholas' initiation into the rules of the game is accomplished when the game's masters take control of his television set, at first subtly insinuating their own words here and there within the broadcast, before fully revealing themselves, speaking through the newscaster. And how does Tyler Durden first appear in Fight Club? As subliminal traces of filmic detritus, his image flashing by on the screen as fast as the “cigarette burn” reel change markers he points out later, or as fast as the subliminal cocks he splices into children's movies. He's the agent of change in the film, just as the game is in the previous film, and they both arrive by warping the fabric of the film itself. Tyler basically wills himself to appear, limited to single frames at first, then longer cameos at the periphery of the narrative, and finally as the central figure. Later, Jack and Tyler's mutual breakdown commences when the film itself starts to slip from its sprockets, shaking and vibrating loose, revealing bits of leader and white light on the edges of the frame as Tyler delivers one of his monologues. For Fincher, film is the medium in which he sets down his thoughts, so it's only natural that he should make his chosen medium the obvious metaphor for both his characters' mental processes and for the destructive/redemptive forces that come to change them.

 

David Fincher

JB: I'd guess that many of us young enough to have been raised with the TV on probably share Fincher's habit of cataloging memories and/or understanding history through cinematic motifs. (As a personal example of the latter: I found myself routinely jarred by Ken Burns' use of rare color footage in The War, because the vibrant images felt anachronistic in a documentary about events that I tend to imagine unfolding in black-and-white, or in the unsaturated hues of Saving Private Ryan.) And that's an interesting place for this conversation to take us as we leap into Fight Club, because this is the film in which Fincher attempts to bring the audience into the action. It's not enough here that we recognize Jack's malaise; Fincher wants us to identify with it. And, so, similarly to the way the audience momentarily becomes Mills at the end of Se7en, Fincher seeks to make the line between Jack and Joe Popcorn indiscernible. That's one reason for never officially naming “Jack.” And, of course, it's also the motivation for having Jack and Tyler break the fourth wall and talk directly to the audience, often in a way that suggests that they are observers of the action more so than players in it—just like us.

 

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