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Luca Guadagnino’s Gay Love Story Call Me by Your Game Gets First Trailer

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Luca Guadagnino’s Gay Love Story Call Me by Your Game Gets First Trailer

Sony Pictures Classics

Luca Guadagnino’s Gay Love Story Call Me by Your Game Gets First Trailer

Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino’s upcoming Call Me by Your Name, adapted by James Ivory from a novel by André Aciman, first earned plaudits at its world premiere at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Less than a month later, at Berlinale, our correspondent on the scene praised the film for the way that Guadagnino funnels the romanticism of the film through an intimate character-based perspective. Call Me by Your Name, which has already been pegged as an Oscar contender, tells the story of the verbally and physically charged relationship that develops between a 17-year-old boy, Elio (Timothée Chalamet), and the older Oliver (Armie Hammer), the new assistant to Elio’s archaeologist father (Michael Stuhlbarg).

David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

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David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

Netflix

David Fincher Netflix Series Mindhunter with Jonathan Groff Gets Trailer

“How do we get ahead of crazy if we don’t know how crazy thinks?” So says the F.B.I. agent played by Holt McCallany at the end of the teaser trailer for the Netflix series Mindhunter. For David Fincher, the show will be yet another opportunity for the filmmaker to return to the scene of his first cinematic triumph: the serial-killer genre. The series, which will also be directed by Asif Kapadia, Tobias Lindholm, and Andrew Douglas, and is executive produced by Fincher, Joshua Donen, Charlize Theron, and Cean Chaffin, concerns the investigative odyssey conducted by two F.B.I. agents (played by McCallany and Jonathan Groff) to “discover the brutal answers.”

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 12

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 12

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 12

Tinkering with the basic building blocks of serialized television has always been a key component of David Lynch’s approach to Twin Peaks, particularly when it concerns tone and timing. The protracted opening segment of “May the Giant Be With You,” for example, demonstrates Lynch’s longstanding penchant for deliberately confounding viewer expectations. And you’d doubtless be in the triple digits by now if you were keeping a running count of the scenes sprinkled throughout the new series that linger lovingly over seemingly inconsequential details. But last night’s installment of Twin Peaks: The Return takes the concept of delayed gratification to whole new levels of perversity—and even apologists for deep-seated perversity are going to have a tough time justifying long stretches of this one.

Game of Thrones Recap Season 7, Episode 3, “The Queen’s Justice”

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Game of Thrones Recap: Season 7, Episode 3, “The Queen’s Justice”

Helen Sloan/HBO

Game of Thrones Recap: Season 7, Episode 3, “The Queen’s Justice”

There are currently two queens vying for control of Westeros, and the latest episode of Game of Thrones centers around the ways in which they rule. “The Queen’s Justice” is an effective summary of the various futures and beliefs for which the protagonists are all fighting for, but much of the episode feels as if it’s going through familiar motions. First there’s Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey), stuck repeating the lessons of her father, Tywin. Her sense of justice is nothing more than revenge, and we already saw that play out in the far more masterful “The Winds of Winter.” And then there’s Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke), who stands in direct contrast to Cersei by distancing herself from her own father, apologizing to Jon Snow (Kit Harington) for Mad King Aerys’s evil, but then again, that’s also nothing new for her.

Insecure Recap Season 2, Episode 2, “Hella Questions”

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Insecure Recap: Season 2, Episode 2, “Hella Questions”

Justina Mintz/HBO

Insecure Recap: Season 2, Episode 2, “Hella Questions”

“You frame a lot of things in your life with ’should,’” Dr. Rhonda Pine (Denise Dowse) says to Molly (Yvonne Orji) toward the beginning of “Hella Questions,” the latest episode of Insecure. The therapy session is considerably different from the one we saw in “Hella Great,” in which a tight-lipped Molly assured her therapist that everything was fine. Spurred by the realization that she’s making less money than Travis (David Hull), her colleague and physical manifestation of white male mediocrity, Molly begins to open up to Dr. Pine, revealing more about herself than she realizes. Dr. Pine asks Molly if she’s heard of “magical thinking,” which is, as she puts it, when we believe what we want will influence the external world as opposed to accepting things as they are. “If those ’shoulds’ didn’t come to fruition,” she asks, “would you feel comfortable with your life looking a different way?”

Jerusalem Film Festival 2017 Siege, Redoubtable, The Beguiled, On the Beach at Night Alone, & More

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Jerusalem Film Festival 2017: Siege, Redoubtable, The Beguiled, On the Beach at Night Alone, & More

Jerusalem Film Festival

Jerusalem Film Festival 2017: Siege, Redoubtable, The Beguiled, On the Beach at Night Alone, & More

Jerusalem is a city of beige and tan, a vast barren sprawl that is, despite the brutal heat and muted colors, quite beautiful. Its odd mix of orthodoxy and modernity pair like sand and cement to create something singular and undeterrable. There’s a kind of delirious, heat stroke-induced grandeur to its aesthetic uniformity, the caramel-colored homes enclosing you and the occasional swaths of trees providing much sought-after shelter from the sun, the tan and green recalling the colors of Israeli military uniforms. All of the buildings are finished with Jerusalem Stone (which is mostly made up of limestone) to marry the new to the old, to transcend date and age. A parched and pale sky settles over sun-baked façades stacked upon sandy expanses. Feet wrapped in leather sandals slap against the sidewalk and air conditioners spittle from above. “Drink water,” everyone advises. At its apogee, the sun abuses unrepentantly, with cruel omnipotence, yet people persist and keep going where they’re going, water bottles in hand. They are stubborn.

Kesha Discovers How to “Learn to Let Go” in New Song and Video

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Kesha Discovers How to “Learn to Let Go” in New Song and Video

RCA Records

Kesha Discovers How to “Learn to Let Go” in New Song and Video

In an interview celebrating the 20th anniversary of the hit sitcom Friends, Lisa Kudrow revealed that her approach to playing Phoebe—her famously eccentric character, whose backstory included a mom who committed suicide, a dad who went to prison, and a pimp who spit in her mouth—was based on a friend from college who “never got down about it, ever.”

Yoko Ono’s Fly, Approximately Infinite Universe, and Feeling the Space, Reissued and Reevaluated

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Yoko Ono’s Fly, Approximately Infinite Universe, and Feeling the Space, Reissued and Reevaluated
Yoko Ono’s Fly, Approximately Infinite Universe, and Feeling the Space, Reissued and Reevaluated

It wasn’t long ago when the notion of Yoko Ono’s discography getting the deluxe reissue treatment would have sounded like a pipe dream—or a pipe nightmare, depending on one’s perspective. But recent years have been kind to the controversial artist, whose importance to contemporary conceptual art, feminism, and even popular music has finally outpaced her reputation as the Woman Who Broke Up the Beatles. Earlier this month, Secretly Canadian Records released their second wave of Ono reissues on CD, vinyl, and digital: Fly (1971), Approximately Infinite Universe (1973), and Feeling the Space (1973). All three are among Ono’s finest and most accessible albums, and they’re also among the first in rock history to so explicitly foreground feminist principles.

Premiere: Boy Meets Boy in Bright Light Bright Light’s “Into the Night” Music Video

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Premiere: Boy Meets Boy in Bright Light Bright Light’s “Into the Night” Music Video

Daniel Robinson

Premiere: Boy Meets Boy in Bright Light Bright Light’s “Into the Night” Music Video

A companion piece to Bright Light Bright Light’s music video for “New York Pretty,” the first single from his new EP Tales of the City, “Into the Night” finds Welsh singer-songwriter Rod Thomas paying tribute to his adopted hometown of New York City. Along his route from Brooklyn to Manhattan, Thomas walks by the Williamsburg Bridge and queer landmarks like Stonewall.

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap Part 11

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Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 11

Suzanne Tenner/Showtime

Twin Peaks: The Return Recap: Part 11

Where last week’s episode of Twin Peaks: The Return brought intimations of encroaching darkness on a tide of unflinching violence and male brutality, last night’s installment divides its time pretty evenly between domestic drama, furthering the show’s overarching mythology, and an extended set piece of seriocomic pop surrealism. In a tidy structural parallel, “Part 11” opens with a pair of scenes that extend (and complicate) events from last week. The first reveals that eyewitness Miriam Sullivan (Sarah Jean Long) somehow survived Richard Horne’s assault and attempted assassination via makeshift gas-oven-and-candle explosive. It’s safe to say that Horne’s misdeeds will now see the light of day, setting up an inevitable showdown with the authorities that seems likely to end in a hail of bullets.