The House


Hurricane Sandy

Collected here are images of Sandy's aftermath.

Disney buys Lucasfilm for $4 billion.

Superfans react.

Google says boo.

William Friedkin's top 10 Criterions.

The Village Voice hires Scott Foundas as principal film writer.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: adolf hitler, barclays center, brooklyn nets, chris christie, george lucas, google, halloween, hurricane sandy, knicks, lucasfilm, new jersey, new york city, sasha frere-jones, scott foundas, the criterion collection, the village voice, village halloween parade, walt disney company, william friedkin


In a Glass CageIn a Glass Cage. Spanish director Agustí Villaronga delivers the grimmest of fairy tales for adults only: a perverse (and occasionally gorgeous) riff on ostensibly endless cycles of sexual and psychological abuse. Villaronga effectively transplants to his native soil the history of Gilles de Rais (a medieval French aristo who fought alongside Joan of Arc before being executed for the rape and murder of hundreds of peasant children), using a fugitive Nazi war criminal as his ambivalent embodiment of evil. After a failed suicide attempt, Klaus (Günter Meisner) is confined to an iron lung (the titular "glass cage"), a pathetic vestige of his former master-race self, left gasping for air like a landed fish every time the power dims. One day, the ironically named Angelo (David Sust) turns up at Klaus's isolated estate, looking for a position as caregiver. Inevitably, it turns out that Klaus and Angelo have a prior history. But Angelo wants more than simple revenge. Villaronga's film suggests at times a heady international brew of styles and themes, all the while remaining a distinctive individual vision: There's a dash of Bergman's stifling chamber dramas, heaping helpings of Pasolini's Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom for its forays into homoerotic sadomasochism, and more than a soupcon of Polanski's insidiously claustrophobic psychological horror. (Cult Epics)

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: 42nd street forever, agusti villaronga, arnold l. miller, brian schulz, bruce campbell, cheryl hansen, christina lindberg, cult epics, david sust, fallguy, fear no more, frank kress, gilles de rais, girl on the run, gunter meisner, gurozuka, henny youngman, herschell gordon lewis, image entertainment, in a glass cage, josh becker, kino lorber, london in the raw, primitive london, ray sager, redemption films, sam raimi, stark fear, synapse films, ted raimi


Cloud Atlas

[Editor's Note: Oscar Prospects is your weekly analysis of an awards contender and how it's likely to fare come Oscar nomination morning. The column is comprehensive, so beware of spoilers.]

You won't find Cloud Atlas on the top rosters of too many Oscar pundits, but at this stage, the alternately thrilling and unwieldy three-hour epic is the season's closest thing to a wild card. Just as there are enough nasty reviews to ward off on-the-fence filmgoers, there are a whole lot of factors playing into the movie's major nomination potential. The biggest—and most cited—benefit is the sheer ambition of Tom Tykwer and the Wachowski siblings' undertaking, which compelled the ever-influential Roger Ebert to call their baby "one of the most ambitious films ever made." The whole project may be a very mixed bag in terms of artistic success, but most evaluators are at least somewhat united by the awe that it inspires, however fleeting that awe might be. The flaws of Cloud Atlas, which include a lack of profundity and clarity the filmmakers themselves seem unaware of, aren't so bothersome when watching it, as the experience is a brisk and spectacular diversion. Even in his barely-positive critique, A.O. Scott observed that this "may be the most movie you can get for the price of a single ticket," and despite a lackluster opening weekend, that virtue shouldn't be counted out. This sprawling spiritual odyssey, which covers six genres in its translation of David Mitchell's celebrated novel, should be taken seriously as a Best Picture contender, and not just a magnet for technical nods.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: a.o. scott, academy awards, alexander berner, andy wachowski, avp alien vs. predator, ben whishaw, cloud atlas, crash, david mitchell, extremely loud and incredibly close, grant hill, halle berry, heike merker, hitchcock, hughes winborne, james darcy, jim broadbent, johnny klimek, lana wachowski, life of pi, lincoln, oscar prospects, reinhold heil, resident evil, roger ebert, scott rudin, the hobbit: an unexpected journey, the matrix, tom hanks, tom tykwer


Aasif MandviA week ago you might have caught Aasif Mandvi on television, in one of his regular appearances on The Daily Show, waggishly offering post-debate closing arguments for the Romney campaign. Mandvi has been a regular "correspondent" for the popular Comedy Central program since 2006, filling reports as "White House Correspondent," "Senior Asian Correspondent," and "Senior Muslim Correspondent." You'll get to see a very different aspect of the actor comedian on stage in Disgraced, a provocative new play currently at the Claire Tow Theater at Lincoln Center.

Mandvi was born in India, spent his early childhood in England, and in the early 1980s, when he was in his teens, immigrated with his family to Tampa, Florida. He subsequently moved to New York in 1991 to pursue a career as an actor. Faced with a dearth of roles for actors of South-Asian descent, he wrote and starred in Sakina's Restaurant, a 1999 Obie Award-winning solo work that explored the Indian immigrant experience, in which he played several roles, both male and female. The play served as inspiration for the 2009 movie Today's Special, which Mandvi co-wrote and starred in, playing the role of a Manhattan chef.

The play Disgraced, written by Pakistani-American novelist and actor Ayad Akhtar, takes place in the tastefully appointed Upper East Side apartment shared by Amir, a successful Pakistani-American lawyer, and his Caucasian artist wife, Emily. Mandvi talked to us recently about the play and his role as the lawyer.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: aasif mandvi, ayad akhtar, claire tow theater, disgraced, obie awards, sakinas restaurant, the daily show


Hurricane Sandy

Tracking Hurricane Sandy.

A big sorm requires a big government.

Mitt Romney avoids taxes via loophole cutting Mormon donations.

Michael Sicinski is tender toward Cloud Atlas.

Some notes on the novella by Ian McEwan.

Our own Calum Marsh on Hollywood's best retroactively redeemed failures.

The greatest zombie movies have something both inhuman and superhuman to teach us.

Tamare E. Adler on the entitled immaturity of Anthony Bourdain.

Thomas Mallon reviews Tom Wolfe's Back to Blood.

Links for the Day: A collection of links to items that we hope will spark discussion. We encourage our readers to submit candidates for consideration to ed@slantmagazine.com and to converse in the comments section.

  • print
  • email

TAGS: anthony bourdain, back to blood, calum marsh, cloud atlas, hurricane sandy, ian mcewan, michael sicinski, mitt romney, mormon church, tamare e. adler, taxes, thomas mallon, tom wolfe, zombies


Hurricane Sandy

Hurricane Sandy gains strength as it churns north.

How Sandy could swing the election.

The xx, Grimes, Cat Power, Louis C.K., and more cancel concerts due to Sandy.

Sara Maria Vizcarrondo issues a Frankenweenie warning.

Former suspect in Etan Patz case to be freed.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: 4th of july asbury park, bruce springsteen, cat power, david bordwell, etan patz, frankenweenie, grimes, hurricane sandy, louis c.k., mta, new york city, pickpocket, sara maria vizcarrondo, the xx, vadim rizov


The Walking Dead

"Do you think they remember anything? The person they once were?" a man asks in the latest episode of The Walking Dead. This is the kind of question you'd expect from someone in a George A. Romero zombie film, specifically one of the more recent ones, wherein zombies exhibit traits of their pre-zombie selves. Here, though, the significance of the question doesn't concern zombies so much as how the human survivors of a zombie uprising project their own fears and insecurities onto the living dead. "Walk with Me" is a notable change of pace for The Walking Dead for several reasons, most clearly its shift in plot trajectory to initiate a new storyline with a new group of survivors. More importantly, however, it's about unearthing the past and recalling a distant life. This becomes clear at the outset, when Andrea (Laurie Holden) and her travel companion, Michonne (Danai Gurira), are discovered by a familiar face at the site of a helicopter crash.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: amc, andrew lincoln, danai gurira, david morrissey, george a. romero, laurie holden, michael rooker, norman reedus, recap, the walking dead, walk with me


Kyle Kinane

With his signature beard and singular charm, one can't help but want to have a beer with Kyle Kinane, host of 30 Seconds Over Washington, an eight-episode web series that pokes fun at political ads, and whose Comedy Central special, Whiskey Icarus, premieres November 24. Having moved to Los Angeles in 2003 to further his stand-up career, the 34-year-old Chicago native now estimates the number of shows he's performed to be well into the thousands. Kinane performs almost nightly, making a living off his dream job.

"What is the role of the stand-up comedian in today's world?" I asked Kinane as he sat down in my living room. He took a deep breath before answering, "I'm split halfway between 'This is a necessary element' and 'You just fucking make fart jokes and expect to be a part of the world.'" I was somewhat relieved that he was torn over his beliefs, as it revealed that he was someone, like me, who did in fact see the inherently personal and societal benefits of the comedian, but also occasionally let the thought creep into his mind that, while this vocation is beneficial insofar as it brings people happiness, it's not necessarily vital to daily life.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: 30 seconds over washington, bill hicks, comedy central, george carlin, kyle kinane, ralph waldo emerson, whiskey icarus


Pusher

In Pusher, which hits theaters this weekend, Briton Richard Coyle stars as a mid-level drug dealer, whose business is booming in London's underground culture. A remake of Nicolas Winding Refn's 1990s thriller, the film (which also marks director Luis Prieto's English-language debut) watches as a drug lord's life implodes, a process with which filmgoers are quite familiar. Throughout much of cinema history, and especially in recent decades, drug pushers of all walks have graced the screen, providing brief escapes for lost souls and party people. But be them morphine sellers, pot distributors, or even moonshine runners, the party has to stop some time.

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: 15 famous, academy awards, al pacino, belly, borderline, bret easton ellis, brian de palma, christopher walken, city of god, clifton collins jr., darren mcgavin, dmx, fernando meirelles, go, howl, hype williams, irvine welsh, james franco, king of new york, method man, milk, mixed blood, monkey on my back, nas, new jack city, pineapple express, pusher, ralph fiennes, raymond burr, robert mitchum


Windows 8

Windows 8 is a big, beautiful, slightly shaky step forward for Microsoft.

Jafar Panahi and lawyer Nasrin Sotoudeh win Sakharov Prize for human rights.

The film locations of Rosemary's Baby, then and now.

Andrew O'Hehir asks, "Have horror movies hit a new golden age?"

Random House and Penguin are negotiating a merger...

...and the news sparks a meme: Random Penguin!

More >>

  • print
  • email

TAGS: barack obama, china, cloud atlas, colin powell, jafar panahi, jen yamato, jim sturgess, lena dunham, microsoft, nasrin sotoudeh, penguin, random house, reverse shot, rosemarys baby, sakharov prize, windows 8







The HouseCategories



The HouseThe Attic

More »



Site by  Docent Solutions