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15 Famous Movie Hotels

Hotel Transylavania

This weekend offers a little something for the wee ones, in advance of everyone's favorite make-believe holiday, Halloween (when, you know, you can wear stuff like this). Hotel Transylvania features the voices of Adam Sandler, Selena Gomez, Steve Buscemi, and CeeLo Green, and it tells the tale of a five-star resort where monsters can go to—get this—be safe from us humans. Hollywood loves to boost its products' escapist qualities by setting them in get-away-from-it-all locales. From L.A. to Vegas to Thailand, the stops on our list boast some very memorable hotels, which vary in their abilities to accommodate, relax, and terrify.

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TAGS: alfred hitchcock, california suite, country hotel, four rooms, garry marshall, grand hotel, hotel, hotel transylvania, jack nicholson, jerry lewis, julia roberts, madonna, north by northwest, oceans eleven, pretty woman, quentin tarantino, richad gere, sofia coppola, some like it hot, somewhere, stanley kubrick, the bellboy, the innkeepers, the night porter, the shining, ti west, tim roth, vertigo


Here and There

Here and There is as studiously unself-dramatizing as its subject, whose signature song, which functions as the movie's theme, includes the refrain, "I just want to be humble with real people." A fictionalized biography, it reimagines a slice from the life of Pedro De los Santos Juárez, a 30-ish amateur musician from a small town in the Mexican state of Guerrero. Like so many of his countrymen, Pedro must periodically desert his family in order to support them, leaving his wife and daughters at home for months or years while he earns money in the United States. But the film doesn't show those journeys or any part of his life north of the border. Instead, it focuses on the home life Pedro clearly cherishes but is forced to keep leaving behind.

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TAGS: antonio mendez esparza, heidi laura solano espinoza, here and there, lorena guadalupe pantaleon vazquez, new york film festival, new york university, pedro de los santos juarez, teresa ramirez aguirre


To the Wonder

Terrence Malick's To the Wonder finally gets a distributor.

Gunman kills four in Minnesota.

Dark Knight Rises shooter reportedly threatened professor.

Watch two new video essays on Werner Herzog.

On the heels of blocking the Veterans' Jobs Bill, the party of obstruction has blocked a Veterans Survivors' Bill. Stay classy.

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TAGS: animal practice, charles r. kesler, christina aguilera, cloud atlas, david mitchell, deee-lite, gop, halle berry, here comes honey boo boo, i am the change, lady kier, mark lilla, nbc, terrence malick, the dark knight rises, to the wonder, veterans jobs bill, werner herzog, your body


Twice Born

Spain is in economic meltdown. Austerity is hitting most of the population very hard. There are strikes and huge anti-government demonstrations throughout the country. Yet those attending the 60th San Sebastián International Film Festival were barely aware of it. Cafés and restaurants were as bustling as usual, and the cinemas were packed. Film critics being film critics talked movies; no mention was made of the real world outside, apart from the "inconvenience" of the one-day general strike in the Basque country that interrupted the festival. However, some of the films in competition attempted to remind the cushioned critics of reality. But did we really want to see another film about the war in Bosnia, the Holocaust, and the Israel-Palestine conflict? Not if they're served as suspect and ersatz entertainments.

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TAGS: aida folch, ali suliman, all apologies, anna fischer, barbara albert, claudia cardinale, emile hirsch, emily tang, emmanuelle seigner, ernst umhauer, fabrice luchini, falling, fernando trueba, foxfire confessions of a girl gang, françois ozon, free radicals, itay tiran, javier rebello, jean-claude carrière, josé sacristán, laurent cantet, penélope cruz, san sebastian international film festival, sergio castellitto, the artist and the model, the attack, the class, the dead and the living, twice born, woody allen


Hyde Park on Hudson

While at first the idea of Bill Murray playing Franklin D. Roosevelt may seem counterintuitive to the actor's sensibilities, on further thought the combination is quite rife with possibility. Throughout his career, Murray has offered up intimate portraits of individuals whose personal vices he spun into inspired bits of comedy (the challenged greenskeeper of Caddyshack, the insufferably self-obsessed Phil Connors in Groundhog Day, etc.), and every so often into devastating visions of isolated, broken men (see Broken Flowers and Lost in Translation). In Hyde Park on Hudson, Murray is up to the task of channeling our country's 32nd president despite a scarce resemblance in appearance and voice. He succeeds in doing so by summoning the otherworldly presence of his famous comedy roles as well as the understatement of his more serious efforts, melding them into a compelling portrayal of a larger-than-life yet mysterious figure such as Roosevelt.

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TAGS: bill murray, broken flowers, caddyshack, colin firth, eleanor roosevelt, franklin d. roosevelt, groundhog day, helena bonham carter, hyde park on hudson, laura linney, lost in translation, new york film festival, olivia colman, olivia williams, richard nelson, roger michell, samuel west, the king's speech, tom hooper


Bruce C. Ratner

Bruce C. Ratner, the Brooklyn Nets, and the future of the Barclays Center, opening this Friday.

The Pink Panther actor Herbert Lom has died. He was 95.

Lil' Wayne tops Elvis Presley's Billboard record.

David Fear chats with Looper director Rian Johnson.

For its "Inspiration Issue," the New York Times Magazine looks into the creative juices behind Django Unchained, Homeland, the latest from Michael Chabon, and more.

It's a gif gaffe party: 33 informercial characters who need to get their shit together.

Movieline ranks the 22 Bond theme songs from worst to best.

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TAGS: barack obama, barclays center, brooklyn nets, bruce c. ratner, david fear, django unchained, elvis presley, herbert lom, homeland, james bond, lil wayne, looper, matt zoller seitz, michael chabon, paranormal activity 4, park chan-wook, pinterest, rian johnson, stoker, the neighbors, the pink panther


Barbara

For those who've seen German filmmaker Christian Petzold's previous films (most recently, Jerichow and the first film in the Dreileben trilogy, Beats Being Dead), the style he employs in his latest film, Barbara, will be familiar: cool, precise, omniscient in its gaze. And yet it's quite possible that he has never quite put that style to such appropriate and cumulatively devastating use.

The director's close-to-the-vest approach fits in the context of a narrative that takes place in 1980 East Germany, a time marked by paranoia thanks to the prominence of the Stasi, East Germany's notoriously corrupt secret police. In an environment marked by fear and distrust, it's no wonder that Barbara (Nina Hoss) maintains a reserved, distrustful profile among her coworkers at the small pediatric hospital in which she works (previously a more well-known doctor in Berlin, she's been banished to this small-town hospital as punishment for applying for an exit visa from the GDR). It doesn't help that, outside her day job, she's spied on and periodically hassled by one Stasi officer, Schütz (Rainer Bock).

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TAGS: barbara, beats being dead, christian petzold, dreileben, jasna fritzi bauer, jerichow, mark waschke, new york film festival, nina hoss, rainer bock, ronald zehrfeld


The Dark Knight Rises

[Editor's Note: Oscar Prospects is your weekly analysis of an awards contender and how it's likely to fare come Oscar nomination morning. The column is comprehensive, so beware of spoilers.]

For those who thought 2012 would be the year in which the Academy made amends to Christopher Nolan, that auteur of urban spectacle whom many believe has twice been robbed of a directing nod, a certain mad gunman likely dashed those already slim hopes. Before James Eagan Holmes opened fire in a Colorado screening of The Dark Knight Rises, ultimately leaving 12 viewers dead, there might have been a chance for Nolan's trilogy capper to at least crack the Best Picture shortlist, if not shuffle him into the running for Best Director. It wouldn't have been the first time Oscar voters rallied around a beloved hopeful, anointing his latest work as a way to honor all of his recent output (which, it should be noted, has made gajillions of dollars for the industry). But many will probably prefer to make a statement with abstention, celebrating films that don't stoke the fire of the whole too-much-violence-in-cinema argument. It's absurd that a freak incident, albeit tragic, is causing such drastic Hollywood ripple effects (like the re-cuttingof the upcoming Gangster Squad), and it's a bit of a shame that, on top of all else, such a nasty PR mess had to befall the folks at Warner Bros. But all that says nothing of the movie's disappointing stance as the weakest of Nolan's Batman epics. Even if there'd been no bloodshed beyond what appears on screen, The Dark Knight Rises likely wouldn't have reached its expectations as a reparative honoree, making up for the 2008 Best Pic snub that allegedly revived the 10-wide field.

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TAGS: academy awards, anna karenina, anne hathaway, christopher nolan, cloud atlas, gangster squad, imax, les misérables, life of pi, michael caine, occupy wall street, oscar prospects, richard king, the avengers, the dark knight, the dark knight rises, the hobbit: an unexpected journey, the master, tom hardy, wally pfister


Andy Williams

"Moon River" singer Andy Williams dies at 84.

AMC promises season four of The Walking Dead.

The Republicans behind the barricades and what the Democrats have to show.

Texas district's new policy allows educators of either gender to paddle students.

Hurry. Read this article by Mark Rappaport on Paul Henreid before Ray Carney takes it down.

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TAGS: andy williams, democratic party, glenn gould, james gray, josef braun, kevin b. lee, mark rappaport, miguel gomes, moon river, muhammad, new york city, paul henreid, ray carney, republican party, richard brody, texas, the walking dead, the yards, yorgos lanthimos


Subway

Anti-Muslim posters spark subway fears.

Feist wins the 2012 Polaris Music Prize.

Oliver Stone posts Vietnam photos.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt on Looper, Lincoln, and mustaches.

Louie C.K. an the rise of the "laptop loners."

Featuring Vadim Rizov and Dan Callahan...another Sight & Sound film poll post-mortem.

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TAGS: born to die, crystal castles, dave kehr, david france, feist, how to survive a plague, jana prikryl, joseph gordon-levitt, lana del rey, lincoln, looper, margaret, new york subway, oliver stone, pauline kael, plague, polaris music prize, ride, vietnam war







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