The House


Clint Eastwood

Hollywood reacts to Clint Eastwood's bizarre RNS speech.

Hologram Ronald Reagan cancelled for being more interesting than Mitt Romney.

CNN camerawoman Patricia Carroll is not surprised by what happened to her at the RNC.

When politicians need sex ed.

No joke, the 10 most jaw-dropping celebrity workout videos.

Internet trolls vote to send Taylor Swift to perform at school for the deaf.

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TAGS: barack obama, beijing independent film festival, clint eastwood, jersey shore, kevin b. lee, la di da film festival, mitt romney, patricia carroll, republican party, ronald reagan, taylor swift, telluride film festival


Paul D. Ryan

Paul Ryan takes the stage at the RNC.

A striking putdown of Ryan's speech last night, especially given the news source.

David Carr talks to Errol Morris.

10 of the greatest Simpsons movie references.

Terrence Malick cuts lots of people from To the Wonder.

Daniel Kasman parses Kiyoshi Kurosawa's Penance.

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TAGS: boris barnet, daniel kasman, daniel mendelsohn, david carr, errol morris, herman cain, jon stewart, junot díaz, kiyoshi kurosawa, mark le fanu, melanie lynskey, nathaniel rogers, paul d. ryan, penance, republican party, stanley kubrick, terrence malick, the house on trubnaya street, the simpsons, to the wonder


Killing Them SoftlyYou really can't miss the irony in the Killing Them Softly poster designs, as both of them are about as soft as a shell casing. Be it the graphic of a loaded pistol pointing in your face, or the ultra-loud placement of sans serif font atop Brad Pitt's shotgun wielder, this ad campaign aims to hit you hard, just in case that title was at all misleading. Released to coincide with Killing Them Softly's premiere at Cannes, where the crime drama lost the Palme d'Or to Michael Haneke's Amour, the first poster looks a whole lot like the front of a trendy T-shirt, and not just because of the flag fabric in that sunglasses silhouette. If not for the title, one would be forgiven for thinking this was a glimpse at H&M's fall line, its flipped stars and stripes all set to grace the rack alongside screen-prints of neon monsters. It's a groovy design, for sure, and its adherence to just a few badass elements ably communicates the no-nonsense cool the film is clearly after. Again, it's decidedly tough stuff, an amalgam of three very masculine bits of "USA!" iconography: the flag, the gun, and the aviator sunglasses. That the whole image calls to mind a certain bandana-rocking, great American train robber is mere gravy.

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TAGS: amour, andrew dominik, animal kingdom, ben mendelsohn, brad pitt, cannes film festival, cogans trade, george v. higgins, hogans heroes, james gandolfini, killing them softly, logans run, michael haneke, poster lab, posters, ray liotta, ricky gervais, sam shepard, the assassination of jesse james by the coward robert ford, the great american train robbery, the office, the weinstein company


Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney secures GOP nomination at the Republican National Convention.

Guess what an RNC attendee said to a black CNN camerawoman while throwing nuts at her?

A pretty unsporting series of portraits from the RNC's first day.

These 30 shocking and unexpected Google Street View photos were not shot by Michael Haneke.

Tony Dayoub celebrates the 20th anniversary of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me.

Matt Zoller Seitz reviews Ron Fricke's Samsara.

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TAGS: cnn, daniel craig, frank ocean, google street view, hammer films, joseph gordon-levitt, matt zoller seitz, michael haneke, mitt romney, republican party, richard brody, ron fricke, samsara, saturday night live, seth macfarlane, shia labeouf, the killers, tom hardy, tony dayoub, twin peaks: fire walk with me


Oprah Winfrey

Oprah Winfrey is still making more money a year than you will in your whole life.

The New York-inspired music of Louie.

A celebration of David Fincher's title sequence, plus a chat with the director.

From the Los Angeles Review of Books: the making of Werner Herzog's Heart of Glass.

Waiting for the apocalypse, from the Romantics to Romney.

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TAGS: chris marker, david fincher, forbes, gabby douglas, heart of glass, los angeles review of books, louie, michiko kakutani, mitt romney, nw, oprah winfrey, paralympics, paul thomas anderson, the master, tyler clementi, viennale, werner herzog, zadie smith


Listen to Slant Magazine's Best Singles of the 1980s, except for most of Prince's songs, because he apparently wants to pretend it's still the '80s.

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TAGS: best singles of the 1980s, billie jean, blondie, cyndi lauper, david bowie, grandmaster flash, janet jackson, joy division, like a prayer, love will tear us apart, madonna, michael jackson, prince, r.e.m., when doves cry


Neil Armstrong

Neil Armstrong, the first human to set foot on the moon, died on Saturday. He was 82.

Anthony Lane remembers the man on the moon.

How to survive film-festival season.

James Franco launches first t-shirt collection.

Shirley MacLaine, the new dame in Downton.

Bret McKenzie and Jemaine Clement reunite to cure kids.

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TAGS: anthony lane, bret mckenzie, downton abbey, ed koch, flight of the conchords, james franco, james holmes, jemaine clement, justin bieber, nasa, neil armstrong, pussy riot, scooter braun, shirley maclaine


MiracleAt one point in Miracle Mile, the first book-length work from Walter Chaw, the Film Freak Central critic writes about how his father's death shifted his perspective on things. Now, he tells us, "I demand that movies show me more about myself. I wonder about tidy endings—they make me angry. I don't believe them." Most cinephiles can point to a critic who left a lasting influence on them, whose words helped chart a course through the vast and mystifying expanse of a century-and-change of world cinema. When I started to realize that movies were more than a way to kill time and would indeed become a large part of my life, I was reading a lot of Chaw. In his reviews, that quality of the demand—of actively searching for what a film has to give—is one of his defining traits.

His most visible reviews, the ones that get quoted and relinked, are often the ones in which those demands aren't met. When he brutally eviscerates movies, it's not for their failure to entertain, but for the wretchedness of their ideologies, as when he recently savaged Transformers: Dark of the Moon as "good, all-American, Patriot Act and Internet-smut fun that will send your handsome white sons off to die in war, armed to the teeth with all the metal-fetish, extreme xenophobia, and sexual frustration this film can pump into them."

But even without the acid, he carries the conviction that movies aren't just singular pieces of art, but also reflections of their milieu, and that when we look at them, we're looking at the desires and neuroses and primal fears lurking in our social psyche. His writing rarely leans on the insular jargon of academia, but probably taught me more clearly than most professors that the zeitgeist is a thing and context matters.

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TAGS: anthony edwards, david cronenberg, film freak central, gene hackman, gravity's rainbow, jonathan lethem, miracle mile, north by northwest, oresteia, remington steele, steve de jarnatt, tangerine dream, the fly, the twilight zone, transformers: dark of the moon, videodrome, walter chaw


The GateLong before Stephen Dorff went Somewhere with Sofia Coppola, he made his screen debut in 1987's horror oddity, The Gate. Directed by Tibor Takács (I, Madman), The Gate pits Dorff against agents of Satan hellbent on destroying all that is wholesome and good in the 'burbs. Depending on your read of the material, this is either a kitchen sink approach to monster movies or a hotbed of "family values" messages, with the Bible literally thrown in for good measure. At one point, a character hoping to exorcise the impending demon onslaught stops reading his Bible and tosses it down the hellhole in his backyard. This is exactly what I would have done, because demons respond better to the Word when it's going upside their heads. The eruption of sparks in response to the Biblical bitchslap made my inner lapsed Baptist smile.

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TAGS: christa denton, louis tripp, michael nankin, stephen dorff, summer of 87, the gate, tibor takacs


The Apparition

This weekend, your antidote to R-Pattz/K-Stew gossip is the sure-to-be throwaway ghost flick The Apparition, starring the crumbling couple's Twilight co-star, Ashley Greene. Serving as Greene's first star vehicle, the new thriller tells of a haunting presence derived from a shady parapsychology experiment, and sees a young woman (Greene) and her hunk husband (Sebastian Stan) scream their guts out before, naturally, calling in an expert (played by Lucius Malfoy himself, Tom Felton). There are plenty of memorable movie specters who've preceded Greene's floorboard-creaking houseguest, and they'll still be planted in viewers' minds long after The Apparition dissolves into oblivion. Who to expect on this week's list? Let's just say that Carmen Maura, Jennifer Jones, and Bill Cosby have more in common than you might have thought.

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TAGS: 15 famous, a christmas carol, ashley greene, bill cosby, blade runner, carmen maura, carnival of souls, changeling, david lynch, george a. romero, george c. scott, ghost, ghost dad, ghostbusters, herk harvey, house, jack nicholson, jake busey, jennifer jones, joe turkel, kairo, kristen stewart, kwaidan, masaki kobayashi, patrick swayze, pedro almodóvar, peter jackson, portrait of jennie, pulse, rex harrison







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