The House


One World Trade Center

With an asterisk, World Trade Center is back on top in NYC.

The New Yorker's Sasha Frere-Jones, who was allowed to see Kraftwerk at MoMA, explains how the pop band ended up at the museum.

Sad New Yorkers and longtime listeners called into 98.7 Kiss FM for the last time yesterday, as the iconic station switched off its transmission at midnight to make way for sports talk radio.

In French election, sobriety is new sign of times.

Una Noche director Lucy Mulloy supports defecting Cuban actors.

One of the films on Steven Shaviro's list is also on mine.

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TAGS: 98.7 kiss fm, animal collective, come walk with me, france, hot chip, kraftwerk, lucy mulloy, m.i.a., new york city, one world trade center, prometheus, sasha frere-jones, stanley kubrick, steven shaviro, the dark knight rises, the new yorker, the simpsons, una noche


The Ghost of Harrenhal

With "The Ghost of Harrenhal," David Benioff and D.B. Weiss try too hard to introduce an elemental aspect to Game of Thrones's focus on the nature of power. A veiled, unidentified woman tells Jorah Mormont (Iain Glen) the reason Qarth's residents lust after Daenerys Targaryen's (Emilia Clarke) dragons is because "dragons are fire made flesh. And fire is power." Fire is thus associated with strength in "The Ghost of Harrenhal" and water represents powerlessness.

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TAGS: alfie allen, charles dance, d.b. weiss, david benioff, emilia clarke, game of thrones, gwendoline christie, hbo, iain glen, isaac hempstead wright, lena headey, liam cunningham, maisie williams, michelle fairley, peter dinklage, recap, stephen dillane, the ghost of harrenhal, tom wlaschiha


BAM150

Commissioned by the Brooklyn Academy of Music, it's no surprise that BAM150 is both celebratory and promotional. But the story of the arts institution that's survived a century and a half is certainly worth commemorating. And director Michael Sládek, best known for Con Artist, the documentary about 1980s New York art world celebrity Mark Kostabi, makes this particular pleasure to watch by adeptly interspersing high-definition performance footage with backstage moments, archival material, and historical commentary.

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TAGS: beijing dance theater, berliner ensemble, bertolt brecht, con artist, harvey lichtenstein, haze, john rockwell, kevin spacey, kurt weill, les arts florissants, mark kostabi, michael sladek bam150, mike wallace, philip lopate, richard iii, robert wilson, the bridge project, tribeca film festival, wang yuanyuan


Total RecallIf recent sci-fi film ads are any indication, all we are is pixels in the wind. Movies like Total Recall, a remake that's poised to give you déjà vu this August, face the predicament of promoting themes like memory and alternate reality, which aren't exactly the easiest things to visualize. Common solutions have been to break matter apart like low-res jpegs, and let the debris disperse in smoky, techy milieus. The first Total Recall poster follows this path, depicting futuristic hero Doug Quaid (Colin Farrell) as if his very identity is being erased in geometric fragments. Why does it look so familiar? Well, you just saw a variation of it—same font and all—during the release of last year's Source Code, whose poster also shattered the hero's existence into flashes and swept them up like confetti. Though not not as clean as the Total Recall one-sheet, the Source Code ad uses the trend as a tool to integrate film stills, filling the pieces with headshots of co-stars Michelle Monaghan and Vera Farmiga. More generically, Farrell's gun-toter just disapparates into thin air, which may well point to how this F/X cash cow will be received.

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TAGS: arnold schwarzenegger, colin farrell, columbia pictures, fright night, in bruges, jake gyllenhaal, kate beckinsale, michelle monaghan, poster lab, posters, sharon stone, snow white and the huntsman, source code, total recall, underworld, vera farmiga


Rubbeneck

Though the title of Alex Karpovsky's new film takes on a literal meaning its final moments, it also applies metaphorically to Rubberneck as a whole—not only to the circumstances surrounding its main character, Paul (played by Karpovsky himself), but also to the unsettling aura of psychological disturbance it instills in a viewer.

Paul is a man unable to shake the memories of the one sexy weekend he had with a female co-worker, Danielle (Jaime Ray Newman), a weekend that ends unceremoniously with her expressing—not directly, but in so many words—her lack of romantic interest in him. The fact that, eight months later, he continues to work in the same building with her naturally increases his obsessive feelings, which shade into jealousy when he witnesses her reciprocating the romantic advances of another male co-worker. This incident, though, is merely the latest manifestation of deep-seated childhood traumas that continue to exert a hold on him in adulthood; the filmmakers leave these stresses tantalizingly vague throughout—something to do with Paul's own broken family and a mysterious basement.

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TAGS: alex karpovsky, beeswax, rubberneck, sleepwalk with me, tiny furniture, tribeca film festival


The Raven

In what's unfortunately one of the lesser films about a literary great, John Cusack wields a quill and a gun as The Raven's Edgar Allen Poe, a legend who would've skewered this thriller in one of his sharp-tongued newsprint critiques. What's perhaps best about the movie is the eerie mood that's established, a mood symbolized by the titular winged creature. Blackbirds have been harbingers of doom in many a dark tale, and otherwise added spooky style to countless filmic palettes. Even in lighter fare, they point to something sinister, be it imminent attack, loneliness, or even racism.

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TAGS: 15 famous, 28 days later, blackbird, brandon lee, brendan gleeson, charlize theron, dario argento, disney, dr. seuss, dumbo, edgar allen poe, frank darabont, horton hears a who, humphrey bogart, i am sam, john cusack, lists, lon chaney, madonna, nightwatch, opera, paul mccartney, snow white and the huntsman, the beatles, the birds, the blackbird, the crow, the lord of the rings, the maltese falcon, the shawshank redemption


Mansome

Morgan Spurlock tries hard to keep his documentary on men's grooming habits lively, but Mansome is only fitfully amusing and doesn't have anything really interesting to say. Two of the movie's executive producers, actors Will Arnett and Jason Bateman, lend their talents (and commercial appeal) by appearing in a framing story that follows the comedic duo as they offer commentary and banter with each other while receiving various treatments at a Los Angeles spa. The movie's other talking heads include Cosmopolitan editor-in-chief Kate White, director Judd Apatow, Adam Carolla, Zach Galifianakis, as the anti-groomer, and a genuinely funny Paul Rudd. A very droll John Waters, whose appearance is all too brief, promises that when he eventually shaves off his pencil-thin moustache, he'll do it as part of a final performance on stage before retirement.

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TAGS: adam carolla, cosmopolitan, jack passion, jason bateman, john waters, judd apatow, kate white, mansome, morgan spurlock, paul rudd, ricky manchanda, shawn daivari, super size me, tribeca film festival, will arnett, zach galifianakis


War Witch

The jury has spoken! Top winners in the 2012 Tribeca Film Festival Awards include War Witch, The World Before Her, Una Noche, and Wavumba.

How Samuel L. Jackson became his own genre.

How Washington went soft on childhood obesity.

NBC fires Miami reporter over edited 911 call in Trayvon Martin case.

Chloë Sevigny in talks for season two of American Horror Story.

Martin Scorsese sure is guzzling the 3D Kook-Aid.

J. Hoberman regards Luis Buñuel.

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TAGS: 3d, american horror story, anthology film archives, carmen, chloë sevigny, cinecitta, j. hoberman, lana del rey, luis buñuel, martin scorsese, migrating forms, nbc, obesity, samuel l. jackson, the new yorker, the world before her, trayvon martin, tribeca film festival, una noche, war witch, wavumba


2Pac

The makers of the 2Pac hologram are threatening to bring other dead celebrities to the touring circuit.

Everyone freak out. The fickle job market is still fickle.

David Carr has a chat with Todd Solondz.

Morrissey, patron saint of gay Mexican Americans, may be reforming the Smiths for a major fall tour. Or not.

Click here to see the first pictures of Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, Jamie Foxx in Quentin Tarantino's Django Unchained.

An interactive look at all the candidates Mitt Romney slayed on his way to the Republican presidential nomination.

New music from The Avalanches?

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TAGS: 2pac, cannes film festival, christoph waltz, cinemacon, david carr, django unchained, jamie foxx, leonardo dicaprio, mitt romney, morrissey, nintendo, ptsd, quentin tarantino, tetris, the avalanches, the hobbit: an unexpected journey, the smiths, todd solondz


The Virgin, the Copts and Me

Namir Abdel Meseeh's documentary is more about the "Me" rather than the "Virgin" or "the Copts" of its title, but since Meseeh is charming, if somewhat self-centered, that's not altogether a bad thing. The French-Egyptian filmmaker, whose parents emigrated from Egypt in 1973, decides that he's going to make a documentary (his first feature-length film) about the various sightings, mainly by the Christian Coptic community, of the Virgin Mary in Egypt. A secular skeptic himself, Meseeh becomes intrigued by the phenomenon when his mother claims that she actually saw the Virgin in a blurry videotape recording of one of the alleged events.

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TAGS: cairo, egypt, israel, namir abdel meseeh, six day war, the virgin the copts and me, tribeca film festival, virgin mary







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